How to View Excel Sheet/Workbook Statistics

If you need to see how many formulas, pivot tables, or form controls you have in a spreadsheet or workbook, check out the Workbook Statistics feature in Microsoft Excel.

If you need to see how many formulas, pivot tables, or form controls you have in a spreadsheet or workbook, check out the Workbook Statistics feature in Microsoft Excel. Let’s explore this feature.

This is for devices running Excel. Screenshots are from Excel in Office 365 on Windows 10

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You may have found statistics in Word helpful for seeing the number of pages, words, or characters. Getting statistics in Excel can be just as useful. You may have a workbook for a class with specific requirements, or you may have a spreadsheet for business that you want to review for unnecessary elements.

View Your Sheet/Workbook Statistics

First, open your Excel workbook. Next, navigate to the Review tab. Now, click Workbook Statistics in the Proofing section. You can also press Ctrl+Shift+G. (Note that the shortcut will not work in Excel for the Web.) Refer to below image:

Stats 1
Accessing Workbook Statistics button

Now, a small window will open to display the data for your current sheet at the top and the entire workbook at the bottom. See below image:

Stats 2
Displaying one Sheet Statistics

If you want details for a different sheet in your workbook, close the Workbook Statistics window by clicking OK. Next click the tab for the sheet that you want to see and follow the same steps listed above. As a downside, the sheet and workbook name are not shown. See following image:

Stats 3
Displaying two Sheets and Workbook Statistics

Data Included

You can see a the following data with the Workbook Statistics feature. This is helpful for situations where you expect to see something in your current sheet or workbook and you do not, or vice versa. Statistics may differ slightly between the spreadsheet and the entire workbook.

Spreadsheet Statistics:

  • The end of the sheet (the last cell with data)
  • Cells with data
  • Tables and PivotTables
  • Formulas
  • Charts
  • Images and objects
  • Form controls
  • Comments and notes

Workbook Statistics:

  • Number of sheets
  • Cells with data
  • Tables and PivotTables
  • Formulas
  • Charts
  • External connections
  • Macros

You can view Workbook Statistics in Excel for Microsoft 365 on Windows and Mac as well as in Excel on the Web. The only difference is that Excel online does not display the complete data lists written above for sheets and workbooks.

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