Five Real Life Samples of Malware

Chances are good you will never seen malware up close and personal. Even if you threw caution to the winds and visited a dangerous site or clicked a treacherous link, your antivirus software probably wiped out any offending program before the latter could say boo. So, you might wonder, just what does malware look like? Would I even recognize a malware program if I saw it?

Courtesy of PC Mag

Chances are good you will never seen malware up close and personal. Even if you threw caution to the winds and visited a dangerous site or clicked a treacherous link, your antivirus software probably wiped out any offending program before the latter could say boo. So, you might wonder, just what does malware look like? Would I even recognize a malware program if I saw it?

To be fair, a lot of malicious programs do not look like anything at all. A virus, for example, tries its best to hide from view while infecting other files and computers. A bot sits quietly on your computer until it gets orders from the command and control center to spew some spam or participate in a DDoS attack on a major website. Trojans, by contrast, appear to be useful, legitimate programs, putting up a pretty façade to hide background activities like stealing your personal data. And when ransomware hollers for your attention, it’s bad news.

This is for all devices

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The Horror of Ransomware

If a ransomware attack hits your computer, you will not know it at first. The ransomware stays out of sight, quietly encrypting your important files. Once the dirty work is done, the malware totally demands your attention with its ransom note. The perpetrators promise that if you pay the specified ransom (usually in Bitcoin or some other cryptocurrency) you will get your files back, but if they take your money and run, you do not have any recourse. You really do not want a direct encounter with ransomware.

Malware Bundled

Sometimes the problem with an installation is notthe program itself, but the software that’s bundled with it. You may find completely legitimate software—even antivirus programs; bundled with adware, spyware, or other unwanted trash. In a case like that, the security vendor is not to blame. A third party created the deceptive bundle. AppEsteem is a young company with a mission to expose these deceptors and to warn legitimate companies when they stray too far toward the dark side of bundling.

The installer shown here offers a free player for FLV video files. Along with the player you are privileged to receive a shady Adware program masquerading as a coupon browser. There’s a checkbox that says you agree to its terms; uncheck the box and you can not proceed. No video player for you! The best thing that can happen with this kind of bundling is that you’re forced to install a program you did not want. Mostly it’s worse than that, because the bundled bonus is malware. Refer to below image:

Malware 2
Bundled Malware

Now here’s something handy; a multi-utility install program. If you read Russian, you know it’s “the fastest and most convenient way to install programs.” Just check the boxes for the ones you want and turn the installer loose. The list includes browsers, messenger programs, video players, even antivirus utilities. But when you install them, you also get a dose of malware. See below image:

Malware 3
Utility Pack Malware

Trojan Horses

Here, we have a sharp-looking utility designed, apparently, to ensure that your PC does not limp along with old, outdated drivers. However, if you try to update any drivers, or back up your existing drivers, you must pay. This is a model used both by some legitimate programs and by rogue antivirus scareware utilities. Lucky you, though: there’s a promotional price that ends today. Its overt activities are just a wee bit suspicious. See following image:

Malware 4
Driver Malware

Want to get into smartphone repair? This set of tools and manuals looks like it might be a big help. Alas, you ca not see just what you’re getting until you pay for your registration. While you are perusing schematics, it collects personal information behind the scenes and takes orders for further unwanted activity from a remote command and control server. Refer to below image:

Malware 5
Smartphone Malware

You probably do not know this, but the EXE files that represent programs on your Windows computer are also called PE files, short for Portable Executable. Every PE file starts with an extensive header that contains a ton of information telling Windows about the program. Malware researchers learn a lot by digging into that header. See below image:

Malware 6
Portable Executable Malware

Lets Hope You Don’t See These

As you can see, malicious programs, like legitimate programs, run the gamut from sad-looking attempts to totally professional ones. With any luck, and with powerful, up-to-date antivirus protection, these images are the only malware you will ever see. Malware is just one of many threats to your devices and private information.

The best utility for finding Malware on your device is Malwarebytes, download here.

Email/Phone Scams

A few reminders to keep the bad guys away in your emails and phone calls:

  • Do not click that link. Instead hover your mouse over each element of the email and look for anything suspicious. If suspicious, do not click that link – per my son, VP at True Digital Security.
  • Do not open emails from FedX, USPS, Wells Fargo, Walmart, Cox Communications, Thank You, SSA, or VA if you have no dealings with them. They will contact you by mail not by phone.
  • Do not give out personal informati0n over the phone. If you need to contact someone, you initiate the call.
  • Never buy gift cards or give out their serial number.
  • If your Userid or Password has been leaked in a data breech, change them as soon as possible.

Quote For the Day

I don’t pretend we have all the answers. But the questions are certainly worth thinking about.

Arthur C Clarke

That’s it. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

Just click the Tweet icon below. This will launch Twitter where you click its icon to post the Tweet.

Check out TechSavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs, and Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

What is Find My Network for Apple Devices?

If you lose your Apple device or an object tagged with an AirTag, you can utilize a network of hundreds of millions of Apple devices with Bluetooth to help get it back.

If you lose your Apple device or an object tagged with an AirTag, you can utilize a network of hundreds of millions of Apple devices with Bluetooth to help get it back. Let’s explore this feature.

This is for Apple devices. Screenshots are from Apple and iPhone XR

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What is Find My Network

Apple’s Find My network is a crowdsourced method of locating your lost iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, AirPods, Apple Watch, or Mac. You can also use it to locate lost items that have AirTags attached to them. It’s available as a free service to Apple device owners.

The Find My network utilizes Bluetooth sensors on hundreds of millions of Apple products to report the location of missing Apple devices around them. When an Apple device on the network detects a missing Apple device nearby, it reports the lost item’s approximate location back to the device’s owner through the Internet.

What About Privacy

You might think that with a network of almost a billion Apple devices reporting back on the location of lost items, there might be some privacy issues. However, Apple has taken privacy into account when designing this network.

Apple has worked to avoid privacy issues whenever possible, engineering a system that utilizes end-to-end encryption while also transmitting anonymized data to keep your device’s location known only to you while also keeping your identity and location private when using a device that’s active in the Find My network. According to Apple, neither it nor third parties can access the location of your devices on the Find My network. Only the person seeking the lost device can see the item’s location. Hey, if you don’t trust Apple, who can you trust? I am pessimistic on this feature.

Apple’s AirTags do pose more of a privacy risk, but Apple has taken steps to make it harder to track people who use AirTags without their knowledge. Time will tell if those measures are sufficient.

Setup the Feature

To do so on an iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch, navigate to:

Settings > Apple ID > Find My > Find My iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch

and tap to turn the Find My network switch On. While here, turn On the Find My <device>, for example, Find My iPhone as shown below. Now, exit Settings. Refer to below image:

Network 1
Enabling the feature

How to Use the Feature

For you to use the Find My network your lost item or AirTag must first have Find My enabled and also be registered to your Apple ID. To locate the item, open the Find My app on your iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, or Mac. Choose the devices tab, tap the device’s name, and you will see its location on a map. If you can’t see it, you can mark the device as lost and hope that someone finds it later and returns it to you. See below image from Apple:

Network 2
Map of lost device – per Apple

Can I Opt Out

Even though the Find My network does not represent a privacy issue for most people (unless you work in a sensitive, high-security field, we recommend that you keep it enabled), you can still turn it off (and opt out) if you would like.

To do so on an iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch, navigate to:

Settings > Apple ID > Find My > Find My iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch

and tap to turn the Find My network switch to Off. Now, exit Settings. See following image:

Network 3
Disabling the feature

To opt out of Find My network on a Mac, open:

System Preferences > Apple ID > iCloud

and then click the Options button beside Find My Mac. In the pop-up window, click the Turn Off button beside Find My network.

Keep in mind that if you turn off the Find My network feature not only will your device’s Bluetooth sensors stop assisting others in locating lost devices, but also, you will not be able to take advantage of its benefits if you lose your device.

Throttled Back

Although not a part of this feature, Apple has been noted in recent lab tests to have “throttled back” (reduced speed) in iOS 14.5.1 on iPhone models 10, 11,and 12. You have to wait for the next iOS update for Apple to fix this issue.

Quote For the Day

Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.

Thomas A. Edison

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Check out Techsavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs, and Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Access Two-Factor Authentication for Major Apps

Two-Factor authentication (2FA) adds an extra security layer to your accounts across the internet. 2FA means your accounts require information beyond user name and password to confirm you are who you say you are before you can get into the accounts. Let’s explore how to access 2FA.

Two-Factor authentication (2FA) adds an extra security layer to your accounts across the internet. 2FA means your accounts require information beyond user name and password to confirm you are who you say you are before you can get into the accounts. Let’s explore how to access 2FA.

This is for iPhone, iPad, PCs and Macs. Screenshots are from Windows 10 and iPhone XR

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The “second factor” comes in after you enter your username and password, which are considered to be the “first factor.” 2FA can be used to confirm your identity by asking for an extra piece of information. The additional information can be:

  • Something you know, like an additional passcode.
  • Something you have, like your phone to receive a one time authorization code.
  • Something you are, like a fingerprint or voice print. This is also called biometric security.

The idea is to provide another piece of information a hacker would not have, making it harder for the bad guy to break into your account.

The following is not an exhaustive list of services with 2FA ability, but we cover the major services everyone tends to use, and walk you through how to access. We will cover Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, Instagram, LinkedIn, Microsoft, and Twitter. Activate 2FA on all of these and you will be more secure. Once you have found their 2FA screens you can can set it up for each app.

Amazon

First, launch Amazon.com on the desktop and login in to your account. Next, click the Menu icon in upper left-hand corner. Now, scroll down the drop-down menu to Your Account option.

Next, click on the Login & Security big button. Now, on the next page, click Edit next to Two-Step Verification (2SV) Settings. The preferred method is an authentication app (scan the QR code); phone number(s) are the backup method. Refer to below image where I already have 2SV based on my phone number (which is dimmed out):

2FA 1
Amazon 2SV

If you think your account has been comprised, go back to Login & Security and click the Edit button next to Secure Your Account.

Apple

Following are the steps on how to access 2FA for Apple using either iOS or macOS.

On iOS go to:

Settings > [your name at the top] > Password & Security > Turn on Two-Factor Authentication.

On macOS go to:

System Preferences > iCloud, then sign in, click Account Details > Security > Turn on Two-Factor Authentication.

Note! once Apple 2FA is activated for two weeks, you can not turn it off. “Certain features in the latest versions of iOS and macOS require this extra level of security, which is designed to protect your information,” according to Apple. See below image for iOS:

2FA 2
Apple 2FA

Facebook

First, login to Facebook on your desktop. Next, click the Down arrow in upper right-hand corner. Now, from the drop-down menu that appears, click on the Settings & Privacy option. On the next screen, click the Privacy & Checkup option. From there, click on the topic How to keep your account secure. Under this topic, you can access 2FA for Facebook. See following image where 2FA is On with a backup method of sending a text message to a phone number.

2FA 3
Facebook 2FA

Related

How to Perform a Privacy Checkup on Facebook

Google

First, sign in to your Google account on your smart device. Next, at the top of the screen, locate the Security tab and tap it. Now, scroll down and tap the 2- Step Verification option. You can continuing scrolling to see more ways to verify you. Refer to below image where my 2SV is already turned On and I am using the backup method of Voice or text message:

2FA 4
Google 2SV

Google calls its system 2SV . It’s all about identifying you via phone. When you enter a password to access your Google account for almost any service, if 2SV is on, there are multiple options to get that second step. First among them now: the Google Prompt. You simply add your smartphone to your account, make sure the Google search app is on the phone, and at login, you can go to the phone and simply acknowledge with a tap that you are the one signing in.

Instagram

First, launch Instagram on your smart device. Next, go to your Profile in lower right-hand corner, then tap the menu (the hamburger icon) on the top-right. Tap Settings > Security > Two-Factor Authentication. There you can choose how you would like to get your authentication code by tapping the Get Started button. See below image:

2FA 5
Instagram 2FA

Linkedin

Business social network Linkedin makes it easy to set up verification, either by SMS texts or authentication app.

First, launch Linkedin on you smart device, then go to your Profile at upper left-hand screen. Next, go to Settings > Sign in & Security > Account > Two-step verification to activate it or deactivate. See following image:

2FA 6
Linkedin 2SV

Microsoft

First sign into your Microsoft account on your smart device. Now, tap your Profile. Next, scroll down and tap Security. 2FA is the second option, tap on it. Once again, tap Two -step verification > Manage. Microsoft will suggest you get app passwords as needed for older service or devices (like Xbox 360); go in later to generate one as needed. Refer to below image:

2FA 7
Microsoft 2SV

Twitter

First, to activate Login Verification on Twitter.com on the desktop, login to Twitter, Click the More menu on the left (the three dots) and select Security & Account Access > Security > Two-Factor Authentication. See following image:

2FA 8
Twitter 2FA

Quote For the Day

Technology is a useful servant but a dangerous master.

Christian Louis Lange

That’s it. With 2FA activated on these apps you are more secure. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

Just click the Tweet icon below. This will launch Twitter where you click its icon to post the Tweet.

Check out TechSavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs, and Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Use Spell Check Everywhere on Chrome

We have all been there; looking up a word on Google just to find out how it’s spelled. No matter the typos, Google usually knows what you want to type. Thankfully, Google allows you to use its spell-check feature everywhere in your Chrome web browser.

We have all been there; looking up a word on Google just to find out how it’s spelled. No matter the typos, Google usually knows what you want to type. Thankfully, Google allows you to use its spell-check feature everywhere in your Chrome web browser.

Called the Enhanced spell check, this setting allows you to access Google’s more advanced spell check whenever you type something on the Internet.

But as is the case with most Google services, there is a privacy cost to this. Turning on Enhanced spell check in Chrome also means agreeing to send everything you type on the web to Google’s server. So enable it at your own risk. But, you can also enable Basic spell check without sending data to Google. Lets explore how to do this.

This is for PCs, Macs, Chrome OS, or Linux running Chrome

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First, open your Google Chrome browser. Next, click the three-dot hamburger icon located in the top right-hand corner. Refer to below image:

Spell Check 1
Accessing the menu hamburger icon

Now, from the drop-down menu that appears, select Settings. See below image:

Spell Check 2
Accessing Settings

Alternatively, you can press the Cmd+Comma keyboard shortcut on a Mac or Alt+E on a Windows PC to access the Settings option.

Next, in the sidebar, click Advanced to reveal the advanced menu. Now, choose Languages from the list. See following image:

Spell Check 3
Accessing Languages under the Advanced section

Under the Spell check section, toggle the radio button in front of the Basic spell check option to turn it On. If you want enhanced spell checking, toggle the radio button in front of the Enhanced spell check to turn it On. Keep in mind, the enhanced option means you are sending your browser activity to Google. Refer to below image:

Spell Check 4
Enabling Basic spell check option

At the time of writing, Enhanced spell check is not available for Google Chrome’s Android and iPhone clients.

In case you are still not satisfied with your Chrome’s spell check, you can give a third party Chrome extension called Grammarly, a try.

Quote for the Day

The number one benefit of information technology is that it empowers people to do what they want to do. It lets people be creative. It lets people be productive. It lets people learn things they didn’t think they could learn before, and so in a sense it is all about potential.

Steve Ballmer, Microsoft

That’s it. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

Just click the Tweet icon below. This will launch Twitter where you click its icon to post the Tweet.

Check out TechSavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs, and Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Preview Safari Links Before Opening

Peeking at the URL of a link that you are about to open is a good way to make sure the URL is what you expect and not a trick by the website.

Peeking at the URL of a link that you are about to open is a good way to make sure the URL is what you expect and not a trick by the website. Let’s explore how to preview Safari links for iPhone, iPad and Mac.

This is for iPhone, iPad, and Mac using Safari

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How to Preview Safari Links on a Mac

Popular desktop web browsers have featured URL status bars for decades. But Safari for Mac does not enable one by default. If you want to quickly check the URL of a link, you can do so by enabling the status bar.

First, open the Safari app on your Mac. Click the View section in the menu bar and choose the Show Status Bar option. Refer to below image:

Safari Link 1
Enabling Status Bar option

Now, with this enabled, when you hover over any link, you will see its full URL address in the status bar in the bottom-left corner of the page. See below image:

Safari Link 2
Displaying URL address

If you ever want to disable this link preview, click:

View > Hide Status Bar

in the menu bar at the top of the screen.

How to Preview Safari Links on iPhone and iPad

Unlike the Mac, Safari on iPhone and iPad does not have a status bar. But it does let you peek into the page that you want to open. You can tap and hold any link to load the page in a pop-up preview window. If you do not like the full preview, you can switch to only viewing the URL (Like Safari on Mac).

First, open a page in Safari on your iPhone or iPad. Next, tap and hold any link on the page. See following image:

Safari Link 3
Accessing a link

Note! For this feature to work, you need to be running iOS 13, iPadOS 13, or higher. You will see a thumbnail preview of the page pop-up. To preview the URL instead, tap the Hide Preview button located at the top of the pop-up window. Refer to below image:

Safari Link 4
Accessing Hide Preview option

The thumbnail will disappear and you will see the URL listed in the box. If it looks safe and you want to open the page from this pop-up, tap the Open button in the menu list. See below image:

Safari Link 5
Open the link

If you want to get the thumbnail peek back, just tap and hold a link again and select Tap to show preview at the top of the pop-up window.

Keeping an eye on URLs is one way that browsing with more knowledge will help you avoid web-based scams and keep you safer on the web.

Quote For the Day

Common sense and a sense of humor are the same thing, moving at different speeds. A sense of humor is just common sense, dancing.

Clive James

That’s it. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

Just click the Tweet icon below. This will launch Twitter where you click its icon to post the Tweet.

Check out TechSavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs, and Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Perform a Privacy Checkup on Facebook

The Privacy Checkup tool allows you to determine how much or how little information you reveal, and to whom.

Facebook has tons of privacy checks that it would take three or more blog posts to cover the topic. In this post we are going to tackle two topics. The Privacy Checkup is tedious and laborious, plus, there are way too many checks. In our opinion, Facebook is a giant bureaucracy, too big for its own good Regardless, you may be surprised at the kinds and amount of information you are sharing, I know I was. Just take the time to discover what you are sharing using Facebook’s Privacy Checkup tool.

The Privacy Checkup tool allows you to determine how much or how little information you reveal, and to whom. Let’s explore this Facebook tool.

This is for devices running Facebook. Screenshots are from Windows 10

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Start Privacy Checkup

To run the latest version of Facebook’s Privacy Checkup tool, first, launch Facebook. Next, click the down arrow icon in the upper right-hand corner, then click on Settings & Privacy. Refer to below image:

Privacy 1
Accessing Settings & Privacy

Now, select Privacy Checkup. See below image:

Privacy 2
Accessing Privacy Checkup tool

Choose the First Topic

Next, in the Privacy Checkup window, click the first topic, Who can see what you share. See following image:

Privacy 3
Selecting the first topic

Now, click Continue. Refer to below image:

Privacy 4
Verbiage about the topic, continue to next screen

Your Profile Information

Next, at the Profile Information window, review the settings for your phone number, email addresses, and birthday. Click the button next to each one, and choose whether to change it to Public, Friends, Only Me, or a specific Facebook list. See below image:

FB Security
What and who sees your Profile Information

I changed my Birthday to Friends (it was already Friends, I kept it the same). To exit, click the “X” in upper right-hand corner. See following image:

Privacy 6
Changing who sees your Birthday

You probably want this information to remain private or only visible to friends or a specific group. When done, click Next. Refer to below image:

FB Security 1
Continue to the next screen

Your Posts

Now, at the Posts window, set the option for who should see future posts. You would likely want to set this to Friends. The Limit Past Posts option changes past posts that were seen by the Public or Friends of Friends to only Friends. Click Next to continue. See below image:

Privacy 8
Who sees your Posts, continue to next screen

Your Blocked People

Next, at the Block screen, you can block specific people from seeing things you post, starting conversations with you, or trying to add you as a friend. To do this, click Add to Blocked list link. See following image:

Privacy 9
Selecting your Blocked List option

Related

How to Block Fact Checkers and Gate Keepers On Facebook

Now, type the name of the person or account you wish to block. From the list of suggestions, click the Block button for the correct person, then click Next. Refer to below image:

Privacy 10
Entering a name to block

Next, click Confirm to block the person and continue. See below image:

Privacy 11
Confirming a blocked person

Now, you will be taken back to the Block screen. You may select another person to block. When finished, click the “X” in upper right-hand corner. See following image:

Privacy 12
Exiting the blocked persons screen

Next, to continue, click Next. Refer to below image:

Privacy 13
Continue to the next screen

You Are Finished With First Topic

Now, the You’re All Set window will open indicating you are finished with the topic. To continue, click the Review Another Topic button. See below image:

Privacy 14
You have finished this topic screen

Choose Your Second Topic

Next, select How to keep your account secure. See following image:

Privacy 15
Select the second topic

Note! My Password is OK and Two-factor authentication is on. Now, click Continue. Refer to below image:

Privacy 16
Verbiage about the topic, continue to next screen

Check Your Password

Next, at the window for Is Your Password Private, click Change Password if you are concerned that it was compromised or you want to change it to something more secure then click Next. See below image:

Privacy 17
Manage your password, continue to next screen

Check Your Two-Factor Authentication

If Two-factor authentication is off, click the Get Started button to add Two-Factor authentication to protect your Facebook account. You want to do this. Just, follow the steps to set this up. Now, click Next to continue. See following image:

Privacy 18
Manage Two-Factor Authentication, continue to next screen

Check Your Alerts

Next, at the window for Turn On Alerts, turn on the switch for any alerts you wish to receive if you or someone else signs into your Facebook account from a new or different location, then click Next. Refer to below image:

Privacy 19
Enable/Disable Alerts, continue to next screen

You Are Finished With Second Topic

Now, the You’re All Set window will open indicating you are finished with the topic. To continue, click the Review Another Topic button. See below image:

Privacy 19
You have finished this topic

You may continue to one or more of the next three topics and follow its directions.



Quote For the Day

“Technology is a useful servant but a dangerous master”.

Christian Lous Lange

That’s it. You now have controlled your Privacy settings in Facebook. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

Just click the Tweet icon below. This will launch Twitter where you click its icon to post the Tweet.

Check out TechSavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs, and Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Automatically Clear Your Browsing Activity When Closing Microsoft Edge

If you are big on security (or keeping a secret), you might not want the Edge browser to keep a permanent record of the sites you browse. If that’s the case, you can use a setting in Edge to automatically erase your data every time you quit the program.

If you are big on security (or keeping a secret), you might not want the Edge browser to keep a permanent record of the sites you browse. If that’s the case, you can use a setting in Edge to automatically erase your data every time you quit the program.

This is for PCs and Macs running Microsoft Edge. Screen shots are from Windows 10

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It lets you delete everything at once on Windows 10 PCs and Macs. You get an almost fresh browser every time you open it to browse the internet. It is handy when you browse only internet banking sites and some other private sites to do something specific.

You can clear the following sets of data:

  • browsing history
  • download history
  • cookies and other site data
  • cached images and files
  • passwords
  • autofill form data
  • site permissions

To setup this feature, first, open your Edge browser. Now, click the three-dot hamburger menu icon from the toolbar. Refer to below image:

Close Edge 1
Accessing the toolbar menu button

Next, from the drop-down menu, choose the Settings option. See below image:

Close Edge 2
Accessing Settings

Now, locate the Privacy, search, and services section from the sidebar. Next, from the Clear browsing data section, click the Choose what to clear every time you close the browser option. See following image:

Clear Edge 3
Accessing clear browsing data for Edge

Now, you will see a list of data that you can clear when closing your browser. Click the toggle next to each data type that you want to clear. Refer to below image:

Close Edge 4
Enabling or disabling what to clear when closing Edge

That’s it. You have set up and started the automatic clearing process. The next time you close the Microsoft Edge browser and start it up again, the designated data will be cleared.

Quote For the Day

“The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life”.

Andrew Brown

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The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Change the Default Fonts in Your Chrome Browser

While changing your browser’s font may not be a pressing issue, sometimes it is fun to make a change. We going to explore how to change the default fonts in Google Chrome.

While changing your browser’s font may not be a pressing issue, sometimes it is fun to make a change. We going to explore how to change the default fonts in Google Chrome.

This is for devices running Google Chrome

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Changing Chrome’s Fonts

In order to change the fonts in Google Chrome, you will need to access your Customize Fonts section. First, open your Chrome browser. Next, click on the three 3-dot (hamburger icon) in the upper right-hand corner. Refer to below image:

Font 1
Accessing your Chrome menu

Now, click on Settings. See below image:

Font 2
Accessing Settings

Next, click on the Appearance tab in the sidebar. Now, scroll down until you get to the Customize Fonts section and click on it. See following image:

Font 3
Accessing your customize fonts section from the Appearance tab

Now, you can change all your font settings. Just click on each drop-down box and select a font from the listing. It is recommended you write down the default fonts in case you want to revert to the original ones. Refer to below image:

Font 4
Accessing the drop-down boxes to change your fonts

When finished, exit Settings and restart your Chrome browser for the changes to take effect.

Quote for the Day

If future generations are to remember us more with gratitude than sorrow, we must achieve more than just the miracles of technology. We must also leave them a glimpse of the world as it was created, not just as it looked when we got through with it.

Lyndon B. Johnson, Former President of the United States of America

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I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Insert a PowerPoint Slide Into a Word Document

The advantage of the Microsoft Office suite is that all the programs in the collection work quite well together. An example is the ability to link or embed a Microsoft PowerPoint slides into a Microsoft Word document.

The advantage of the Microsoft Office suite is that all the programs in the collection work quite well together. An example is the ability to link or embed a Microsoft PowerPoint slides into a Microsoft Word document. Lets explore how this is done.

This is for devices running PowerPoint and Word

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Copyright Scott Adams, Inc./Distributed by Universal Uclick for UFS

Linking vs. Embedding Explained

If you link or embed a PowerPoint slide in a Word document, the goal is always the same; to provide an external reference that complements the content of the document. However, there are subtle differences between linking and embedding that you should be aware of.

The difference between linking and embedding an object is how the object’s data is stored and how the object’s content is updated. Since data is stored differently between the two methods, the content update process will also be different.

If you link an object, then that link simply sends the reader to the location of the source object when clicked. The file itself does not actually store any data from the linked object to the file. This is advantageous if the object you are linking to is large in size and you need to reduce the size of your Word document.  The downside is that if the location of the linked object changes, the link in your Word document will break.

If you embed an object, then you do not need to worry about whether the location of the object changes, as it becomes part of the document itself. That is, Word stores the object data in the actual Word file. The good news is that you do not have to worry about broken links in your document. The downside is that when the object is updated, those updates are not reflected in your embedded object, because there is no link connecting it to the source. Also, you will need to consider that the file size increases with embedded objects.

Link or Embed a PowerPoint Slide into a Word Document

First, open the PowerPoint project that contains the slide you want to link or embed. Now, select the desired slide by clicking its preview thumbnail. Refer to below image:

PowerPoint 1
Selecting a PowerPoint slide

Next, copy the slide to your clipboard by using the Ctrl+c (Cmd+c on Mac) keyboard shortcut, or by right-clicking the slide and selecting Copy from the context menu. See below image:

PowerPoint 2
Selecting the Copy option

Now, open your Word document you would like to link or embed the slide to. In the Clipboard group of the Home tab, click the down arrow under Paste. See following image:

PowerPoint 3
Selecting the Paste option

In the drop-down menu, click Paste Special. Refer to below image:

PowerPoint 4
Selecting the Paste Special option from drop-down list

The Paste Special window will appear. If you have copied the PowerPoint slide to your clipboard, you will see a Microsoft PowerPoint Slide Object option in the box under As. Next, click it to select the option. If you do not see this option, repeat the above steps. You may not have copied the slide to your Clipboard.

  • To embed the slide, click the bubble icon next to Paste
  • To link the slide, click the bubble icon next to Paste Link.

Now, select OK to insert the linked or embedded object. See below image:

PowerPoint 5
Selecting the Paste option to embed the PowerPoint slide

Your final Word document should look like the following image:

PowerPoint 6
Your Word document with the PowerPoint slide embedded

The Microsoft PowerPoint slide is now linked or embedded into your Microsoft Word document.

That was easy. You are now finished. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

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Check out TechSavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs, and Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

Browser Extensions May Be Looking At Your Data

Have you ever noticed the message you see when you install a browser extension in Chrome, for example? For most browser extensions, a message appears stating that the extension can “Read and modify all of your information on the websites you visit.”

Have you ever noticed the message you see when you install a browser extension in Chrome, for example? For most browser extensions, a message appears stating that the extension can “Read and modify all of your information on the websites you visit.” Refer to below image where we are looking at DuckDuckGo Privacy Essentials extension, an Internet privacy company, on their permissions:

Extension 1
Viewing a Chrome extension for permissions

What! Does not look secure to me as it reads all data on your device. You want to remove this browser extension and similar extensions for privacy issues.

To review your Chrome browser extensions:

  • Open Chrome, and click the 3-dot hamburger icon in upper-right hand corner.
  • Click on More Tools, then Extensions. They will be listed alphabetically.
  • Find a browser Extension that is enabled. Click on its Details button. Now, scroll down to the Permissions and Site Access sections to view how it is accessing your data.

You may be surprised as to the information the Extension is collecting on you. Let’s explore what this is about.

This is for modern day browsers like Edge, Chrome, Firefox, and Safari. Screenshots are from Chrome desktop version

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This means that the browser extension has full access to all web pages you visit. It can see which web pages you are browsing, read their content and look at everything you write. It can even modify the web pages; for example by inserting additional ads. If the extension is malicious, it can collect all your private information; from web activity and emails you write to your passwords and financial information; and send it to a remote server on the Internet.

I am tired of receiving fake emails, texts, tweets, posts, and so on. Recently I have been receiving media from Thank You, USPS, Wells Fargo, Cox Communications, and so on.

This is primarily due to my accounts being compromised and sold. Another reason is some browser extensions is watching my activity.

If a browser extension is completely reliable and trustworthy, that’s fine. The browser extension may behave responsibly and not capture any data or interfere with your banking information.

We do not say that you have to uninstall every browser extension you have. Instead, you just realize the enormous access you give to the browser extensions you install and act on accordingly.

See below image for a popular Chrome extension, Todolist, permissions allowing access to its web site:

Extensions 2
Viewing a Chrome extension for permissions

But keep this in mind; if you do not trust the add-on, you may not want to run it in the first place. We recommend you click the Remove button to delete any extension you do not trust. See following image:

Extensions 3
Removing a Chrome extension

That’s it. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

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Check our TechSavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs, and Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath