How to Create Windows 10 Recovery USB Drive

Have you received the dreaded “No bootable device found” message or a similar one on boot? My wife recently received this message on her PC. Windows 10 would not load. This usually means your hard drive has failed or your PC Master Boot Record (MBR) is corrupt. In her case, the hard drive had failed. We got no warning the hard drive was failing, it died immediately.

Have you received the dreaded “No bootable device found” message or a similar one on boot? My wife recently received this message on her PC. Windows 10 would not load. This usually means your hard drive has failed or your PC Master Boot Record (MBR) is corrupt. In her case, the hard drive had failed. We got no warning the hard drive was failing, it died immediately.

Let’s explore how to create a Windows 10 recovery USB drive to reset your computer to load Windows 10 or reinstall the operating system..

You should create this USB recovery drive after each major upgrade of Windows 10; which is usually every 6 months.

Related

How to Fix a Detected Hard Disk Problem

How to Check Your Hard Drive Status

Microsoft File Recovery Tool for Windows 10

This is for devices running Windows 10

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What is a Windows 10 Recovery Drive

If you do not have a USB drive to create Windows 10 recovery disk, you can use a CD or DVD to create s system repair disc. Both types of Windows 10 recovery media allow you to use Windows recovery options even when your computer fails to boot. If you cannot restore your computer, Windows 10 boot repair disk also gives you a chance to reinstall Windows 10.

We will be using the built-in Recovery Media Creator.

You may be concerned about the Windows 10 recovery USB size. While creating a recovery drive, the program will copy a lot of files to the USB drive, so you need to prepare a flash drive that has at least 16 GB capacity (32 GB is preferred) and ensure it’s empty, because all the data on the USB drive will be deleted in this process. If the drive is new, it will be formatted during the recovery creation process.

Create the Recovery Drive

First, connect the USB drive to your computer, and then type “recovery drive” into the Cortana search box. In the listed results, select Recovery Drive app. Refer to below image:

Recovery Drive 1
Start the Recovery Drive app

In the pop-up window that appears, check the option Back up system files to the recovery drive and click Next. See below image:

Recovery Drive 2
The create a Recovery Drive dialog

Now, select the USB flash drive you prepared, and click Next to continue. See following image:

Recovery Drive 3
Selecting your USB device

On the next screen, click Create the recovery drive link to begin creating your Windows 10 recovery USB drive. Refer to below image:

Recovery Drive 4
A warning message that the contents of the USB will be deleted

After finishing this process, you may see an option Delete the recovery partition from your PC. If you have a Windows recovery partition on your PC, you can click it to delete the recovery partition and free up some space on your computer.

When your computer fails to boot, you can use this recovery USB drive to restore Windows 10 to a new hard drive. After installing a new hard drive, power up your computer, change boot order in BIOS to boot your system from the USB drive and follow on-screen instructions to finish the restoration.

Restoring Windows

The recovery drive created by Recovery Media Creator will not work across different versions of Windows. In other words, you cannot use a Windows 8 recovery disk to restore Windows 10, nor can you use a recovery drive made by Windows 10 64-bit to boot a 32-bit computer. That is to say, you cannot create a Windows 10 recovery USB disk from another computer to use for your computer with the built in tool.

Sometimes, you are not allowed to create recovery disk in Windows 10 and the built-in tool says, “We can’t create the recovery drive. A problem occurred while creating the recovery drive”.

Recovery Drive 5
The Recovery Drive problem dialog

If Windows fails to create a recovery drive with the error “We can’t create the recovery drive”, you should first check whether your USB drive is well connected and can be recognized by Windows. If that is not the case, you can simply download the Windows 10 recovery disk ISO file and burn it to your USB flash drive or CD/DVD.

That’s all on how to create Windows 10 recovery disk on a USB drive. As mentioned earlier, you should do this after each major upgrade of Windows 10.

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Three Tweaks to Speed Up Windows 10

Windows 10 is speedier than the previous versions of Microsoft’s desktop operating system, but you can still optimize its performance.

Windows 10 is speedier than the previous versions of Microsoft’s desktop operating system, but you can still optimize its performance.

There are performance factors to consider after you are up and running from a previous version of Windows. Even the latest Windows version isn’t immune to slowdowns.

For people with older, low-power machines who want a speed boost, a few tips towards this end does boost system performance. Lets explore these three tweeks.

This is for devices running Windows 10

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Tweak 1 – Check for Viruses

You can run the built-in Windows Defender or a third-party app to do this, but you are best served by a top pick among malware-cleanup programs, the free Malwarebytes app. Click here to download. Just install and run. Refer to below image:

Tweaks 1
Malwarebytes main screen

Tweak 2 – Change Power Settings

This tweak could boost your PC’s computing speed but at the expense of electricity. Head to

Settings (press Start, then the gear icon in lower left-hand corner or your desktop icon) > System > Power & sleep

To the right of your screen, click the Additional power settings link.

Now, click the dropdown arrow on the right side to Show additional plans. Next, select High Performance. See below image:

Tweaks 2
Accessing power settings

Tweak 3 – Turn Off Notifications

Yes, like your smart phone, Windows 10 has annoying tips and notifications.

If Windows does not need to generate a notification, your computing will go faster. I have over 20 apps that are capable of sending notifications. To turn them off, head to

Settings (press Start, then the gear icon in lower left-hand corner or your desktop icon) > Notifications & actions

Next, you may want to disable the Get, tips, tricks, and suggestions as you use Windows. See following image:

Tweaks 3
Accessing types of Notifications

Now, scroll down to the Get notifications from these senders section. You will see a list of individual apps that can send notifications, and you can uncheck those you do not want to hear from. These notifications reduce processing that Windows needs to do to display relevant information for your system. If Windows does not need to generate a notification, your computing will go faster. Refer to below image:

Tweaks 4
Disabling Notifications from senders

An easy way to pause notifications is to tap the Focus Assist button in the Action Center.

To open the Action Center, do one of the following:

  • On the right end of the taskbar, select the Action Center icon
  • Press the Windows logo key  + A
  • On a touchscreen device, swipe in from the right edge of the screen

Just tap through the Focus Assist button to view your options for type of notifications to receive or turn them off. This also makes it easier to re-enable them later.

You are finished with these three Windows 10 tweaks. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

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How to Set a Custom Color for Start Menu in Windows 10

Out of the box, the Start menu includes a default layout with elements and settings that usually fit most people. However, if you want to make it more functional and personal, the experience available on Windows 10 is highly customizable.

On Windows 10, the Start menu is an essential component, as it is the experience you use every day to find apps, settings, and files.

Out of the box, the Start menu includes a default layout with elements and settings that usually fit most people. However, if you want to make it more functional and personal, the experience available on Windows 10 is highly customizable.

Starting with the October 2020 update, Windows 10 now defaults to a light theme that takes away accent colors from your Start menu and Taskbar. If you would like to select a custom color for your Start menu, there is an easy way to pick it in Settings. Let’s explore how to do this.

This is for devices running Windows 10

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Selecting Colors Settings

First, launch Settings by pressing Windows+I keys or by opening the Start menu and clicking the gear icon on the left. Refer to below image:

Start 1
Accessing Settings

In Settings, click the Personalization option. See below image:

Start 2
Accessing Personalization option

Now, in its settings, click the Colors option. See following image:

Start 3
Accessing Colors option

Selecting your Colors

Next, in the Colors settings, locate the Choose your color drop-down menu. In this menu, select Custom. Refer to below image:

Start 4
Selecting Custom color option from drop-down

Now, two new choices will appear. Under Choose your default Windows mode, select Dark. This Dark mode is required for colorizing of your Start menu.

Now, under Choose your default app mode, select one of two options, Light or Dark, whichever one you would like the best. See below image:

Start 5
Selecting Dark mode

Selecting your Accent Color

Next, scroll down the Colors page and locate the Choose your accent color section.

If you want the color to automatically match your desktop background image, checkmark Automatically pick an accent color from my background. Otherwise, click a color in the grid that you would like to use for your Start menu and Taskbar. You can also pick a custom color by clicking the Custom color button below the grid. See following image:

Start 6
Selecting your accent color

Now, locate the Show accent color on the following surfaces section and checkmark Start, taskbar, and action center.

Note! If this option is greyed out, make sure you select Dark as your default Windows mode above. It won’t work in Light mode. Refer to below image:

Start 7
Selecting your accent color on surfaces

Your New Look

The next time you open your Start menu, you will see that it has changed to the accent color you selected. See below image:

Start 8
Your new Start colorized icons

If you ever want to switch back to the standard Windows 10 theme, open

Settings > Personalization > Colors

and select Light in the Choose your color drop-down menu.

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How to Manage System Folders in Start Menu in Windows 10

On Windows 10, the Start menu is an essential component, as it is the experience you use every day to find apps, settings, and files.

On Windows 10, the Start menu is an essential component, as it is the experience you use every day to find apps, settings, and files.

Out of the box, the Start menu includes a default layout with elements and settings that usually fit most people. However, if you want to make it more functional and personal, the experience available on Windows 10 is highly customizable.

We are going to explain a little know feature, manage the system folders. Here’s how to do this:

This is for devices running Windows 10

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The User, Documents, Pictures, Settings and Power options are now tucked away in a column on the far left of the Start menu. Click the button at the top left of the Start menu to expand this column. Refer to below image:

Start Menu 1
The default Start menu System folders

First, launch Settings by pressing Windows+I. Now click the Personalization option. See below image:

Start Menu 2
Accessing Personalization option in Settings

Next, click the Start option. See following image:

Start Menu 3
Accessing the Start option

On the right, scroll all the way to the bottom and click the Choose which folders appear on Start link. Refer to below image:

Start Menu 4
Accessing the System folders link

Now, choose whatever folders you want to appear on the Start menu. See below image:

Start Menu 5

Enable/Disable System folders to appear on Start Menu

I have selected several folders. To view an icon’s associated text, just hover your mouse over an icon. See following image for the my new system Start menu:

Start Menu 6
Your new System folder Start menu

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How to Access Full Screen Startup in Windows 10

While in desktop mode, Windows 10 allows you to use the Start menu in a full-screen mode or in a way that only covers part of the screen.

While in desktop mode, Windows 10 allows you to use the Start menu in a full-screen mode or in a way that only covers part of the screen. Lets explore how to do this.

Depending on how you have your Start menu configured, a full-screen Start menu covers the entire screen (but not the Taskbar), and you can change between a “pinned tiles” view and an “all apps” view using the buttons in the upper-left corner.

In either view, you will see a screen full of shortcuts that you click on to launch an application. Refer to below image for a partial view of my desktop:

Start 1
Partial Desktop screen

To configure whether you see the full-screen Start menu in desktop mode or not, we need to make a change in Windows Settings.

This is for devices running Windows 10 operating system

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First, click the Start menu, select the Gear icon on the bottom left, then click Settings, or press the Windows+I keys to open Settings. See below image:

Start 2
Accessing Settings

Now, click on Personalization. See following image:

Start 3
Access Personalization

Next, select Start from the sidebar to open the its settings. Refer to below image:

Start 4
Accessing Start option

In Start menu settings, scroll down to the switch labeled Use Start Full Screen. If you would like to use the Start menu full screen in desktop mode, set this switch to On. If you do not want Start to cover the entire screen when you open it in desktop mode, set this switch to Off. See below image:

Start 5
Disabling Start Full Screen

Note! If your PC is in tablet mode, it will always show a full-screen Start menu.

You do not have to use a full-screen Start menu to get more room for shortcuts. If you would like to use a larger Start menu without having it occupy the full screen, you can easily resize the Start menu by clicking and dragging its edges.

Also, you can add a few more tiles by enabling the switch labeled Show more tiles located at the top of Start menu settings. Refer to above image.

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How to Check If You Have the Latest Version of Windows 10

The latest version of Windows 10 is the October 2020 Update, version “20H2,” which was released on October 20, 2020. Microsoft releases new major updates about every six months.

The latest version of Windows 10 is the October 2020 Update, version “20H2,” which was released on October 20, 2020. Microsoft releases new major updates about every six months.

This is for devices running Windows 10

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These major updates can take some time to reach your PC since Microsoft and PC manufacturers do extensive testing before fully rolling them out. Let’s find out what version you are running, and how you can skip the wait and get the most recent version if you do not already have it.

This update was codenamed “20H2” during its development process, as it was released in the second half of 2020. Its final build number is 19042.

Related

How to Understand Windows 10 Names and Numbers

How to Check for the Latest Version

First, open your Start menu, and then click the gear-shaped Settings icon or press the Windows+I to open the Settings app. Refer to below image:

Latest Version 1
Accessing Settings

In the Settings window, head to

System > About

and then scroll down toward the bottom to the Windows Specifications section.

A version number of “20H2” indicates you are using the October 2020 Update. This is the latest version. If you see a lower version number, you are using an older version.

In my example below, I am using “2004”, the May 2020 Update. See below image:

Latest Version 2
Accessing Windows About information

To find out information on Microsoft Windows releases, head to Microsoft’s Windows 10 release information web page. Just look at the most recent version under “Semi-Annual Channel” section.

How to Get the Latest Version

The best way to do this is by typing in Windows Update in the Cortana search bar in lower left-hand corner of your screen. Next, click on the Windows Update settings in upper left-hand corner of your screen. Now, click the Check for updates link for any updates and install per instructions. See following image where it says I am up to date, but there is an update available, the October 2020 update with an Download and Install link:

Latest Update 3
Checking for Windows updates

An alternate method is to visit Microsoft.com and hit the Update now button visible on the page. A small exe file, the Update Assistant tool, will be downloaded to your computer. Refer to below image:

Latest Version 4
Download the Windows Update Assistant tool

When you run this file, you will see the main screen of the Update Assistant tool. It will let you know if you are running the latest version of the Windows and whether your PC is capable of running it.

Click on Update now to start the upgrade process.

The tool will run a few compatibility checks for your PC and disk space required for installing the update.

If all appears well, the Update Assistant will access the Microsoft servers.

It will offer you two options:

  1. Upgrade this PC now
  2. Create installation media

Now, chose the first option.

The main highlight of the whole upgrade process is that all your files will be safe and right where you left them. Also, if the method does not work, you can go back to a prior version of Windows 10 anytime.

The install will take some time and your PC will restart several times. The best you can do is wait till the upgrade is finished..

In the end, when the process is complete you could either choose to restart the PC right way or after some time to allow the changes to take effect.

Note: By running the Upgrade Assistant, you are forcing Windows 10 to upgrade itself. Even if there is a known problem with the update on your computer, Windows will ignore the problem and install the update anyway. Microsoft recommends you check for any known problems impacting your system first.

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How to Understand Windows 10 Names and Numbers

Windows 10 has a lot of overlapping version numbers and names. For example, the October 2020 Update is also called 20H2, version 2009, and build 19042. It often seems like different teams at Microsoft are speaking different languages. Here’s how to understand Microsoft’s jargon.

Windows 10 has a lot of overlapping version numbers and names. For example, the October 2020 Update is also called 20H2, version 2009, and build 19042. It often seems like different teams at Microsoft are speaking different languages. Here’s how to understand Microsoft’s jargon.

This is for the Windows 10 operating system

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The Development Codename

Each Windows 10 Update starts with a development codename. In recent years, Microsoft has simplified these.

For example, Windows 10 20H2 became the October 2020 Update. It was named “20H2” because it was planned for release in the second half of 2020.

In theory, these development codenames are just that; for the Windows development process. In practice. Microsoft has a lot of documentation that uses them, referring to “20H2” and “20H1.” These modern development codenames are easy to understand.

These development codenames appear to be replacing the version numbers in Windows 10’s interface. To view your codename, go to:

Settings > System > About

Here you willl see the development codename presented as the “version” under Windows Specifications. Refer to below image:

Win Version 1
The About option

Here is a list of Windows 10’s development codenames for 2020 and 2019 updates:

  • 20H2 became the October 2020 update
  • 20H1 became the May 2020 update
  • 19H2 became the November 2019 update
  • 19H1 became th May 2019 update

Prior to this, Microsoft named these updates “Redstone” and “Threshold”. Threshold 1″ was the original codename for Windows 10.

The Marketing Name

To make things “simpler” for us, Microsoft created official names for each update, designed to make them human-readable. When an update is near release, it gets one of these names.

In recent years, these names have been pretty self-explanatory. “October 2020 Update” and “May 2019 Update” are easy terms to understand. That’s the month and year the update was released. It’s more precise than “20H2” and “19H1.”

We call them “marketing names” because that’s what they originally were. Despite Microsoft presenting names like “October 2020 Update” as the official ones, many Microsoft documents use terms like “20H2” or “version 2009” instead. Even Windows 10 itself doesn’t use this name; perhaps because it’s created by the engineers and not the marketing department.

The Version Number

Windows 10 has version numbers which are different from the development codename. The Windows 10 October 2020 Update is technically Windows 10 version 2009. The first two digits represent the year and the last two digits represent the month.

Microsoft is confusing us. The version number seems to refer to the month the update was “finalized” (and perhaps released to Insiders), while the marketing name refers to the update the month was released.

Here’s a list of 2020 and 2019 version numbers for Windows 10 updates:

  • The October 2020 Update is version 2009, which refers to September 2020
  • The May 2020 Update is version 2004, which refers to April 2020
  • The November 2019 Update is version 1909, which refers to September 2019
  • The May 2019 Update is version 1903, which refers to March 2019

Microsoft is getting away from these numbers, with development names like “20H2” now shown in the System panel. Another way to view your version number is to launch the winver dialog:

  • Press Windows+R
  • Enter winver in the dialog box
  • Press Enter or OK

See below image:

Win Version 2
The Windows version and OS Build number

In older versions of Windows 10, these screens showed the version number instead.

The OS Build Number

Windows 10 also has operating system (OS) build numbers. During the Windows development process, each “build” of Windows 10 released has its own build number.

After much testing and bug-fixing, Microsoft settles on a final build that will be the stable version of the update. When the stable update is released, it still has this OS build number.

The October 2020 Update has the OS build number “19042.” Technically, the full build number is “10.0.19042,” to indicate that it’s a Windows 10 build. Only the last five digits change.

Also, there are minor build numbers; the stable version of 20H2 is initially “19042.572”, but the “572” number will increase as Microsoft issues minor patches for the update. Here is a list of 2020 and 2019 OS build numbers:

  • 20H2 is build number 19042.
  • 20H1 is build number 19041.
  • 19H2 is build number 18363.
  • 19H1 is build number 18362.

What Does All This Mean?

At times, it seems like different teams at Microsoft are speaking different languages. One document talks about 20H2, another talks about version 2009, a technical document refers to build 19042, and the marketing team talks up the October 2020 Update. They’re all talking about the same thing.

Now that you understand this, it’s easier to make sense of the mess of version numbers you see across Microsoft’s websites and within Windows 10 itself.

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How to Switch Virtual Desktops in Windows 10

Virtual Desktops, or Windows, are a handy way to juggle multiple workspaces in Windows 10. There are several ways to switch between virtual Desktops.

Virtual Desktops, or Windows, are a handy way to juggle multiple workspaces in Windows 10. There are several ways to switch between virtual Desktops. Let us explore how to do this.

This is for Windows 10 operating system

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Use Keyboard Shortcuts

Press Windows+Tab to see the virtual Desktops you have available. You will see a screen called “Task View,” which shows thumbnails of each.

Now, release the Windows key and press the Tab or Arrow keys to highlight a Desktop, then press Enter to view that Desktop. You may also switch Desktops by using the Alt+Tab keys.

Also, you can press Windows+Ctrl+Left Arrow to display a lower number Desktop or Right Arrow to a higher number Desktop.

While in “Task View”, click the Plus “+” Tile or press Windows+Ctrl+D to add a new Desktop. Click the “X” in the upper corner to remove a Desktop.

If you want to exit the “Task View”, just hit Escape to return to your Desktop.

Use the Taskbar

Right-click on an empty area of the Taskbar, then click Show Task View Button. Ensure the option is checkmarked. Refer to below image:

TaskView 1
Setting the Show Task View option

Now, locate and click the Task View button in the Taskbar to view your Desktops. Next, click or tap the Desktop to which you want to switch. See below image:

Task View 2
Accessing the Task View button

You can click Task View at any time to manage your virtual Desktops.

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How to Remove Adobe Flash Player in Windows 10

At the end of 2020, Adobe will kill its Flash Player app for security reasons. Microsoft is taking a pre-emptive strike though by using an optional Windows Update to both uninstall and block Flash from being reinstalled.

At the end of 2020, Adobe will kill its Flash Player app for security reasons. Microsoft is taking a pre-emptive strike though by using an optional Windows Update to both uninstall and block Flash from being reinstalled.

It seems the update does not check to see if Flash has been installed using Adobe’s standalone installer, meaning if you have ever installed Flash Player manually, it remains available to use. Web browserscan also have a Flash Player component installed, and these also remain available after the update.

If you have no intention of using Flash again, the Windows Update to remove it is worthwhile simply to make your system a bit more secure. However, it’s worth checking if the Flash Player is installed as an app as well and removing it.

This is for the Windows 10 operating system

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To check this:

  • Launch Settings (the gear icon)
  • Click the Apps option

Refer to below image:

Flash 2
Accessing the Apps option

If it is there, click on the app and select Uninstall to remove the app. In my example, the app has been removed and is no longer listed. See below image:

spacer

Flash 1
Your installed apps


Now, lets check your web browser. For Google Chrome:

  • Launch Chrome
  • Click the Hamburger icon in upper right-hand corner (the one with 3 dots)
  • Click More tools
  • Click on Extensions

See following image:

Flash 3
Accessing Chrome extensions


If it is there, click on the slider to disable or the Remove option to delete the app (this is the recommended choice). In my example, the app has been removed and is no longer listed. Refer to below image:

Flash 4
Your Chrome extensions

That’s it. You have successfully removed the app and its Chrome extension. Be sure to run the Windows optional update when available.

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Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

Five Ways to Lock Windows 10

Locking your Windows 10 PC is the best way to secure your computer when you step away. This will not quit or interrupt any running applications. When you return, you have to enter your PIN or password to get past the lock screen.

Locking your Windows 10 PC is the best way to secure your computer when you step away. This will not quit or interrupt any running applications. When you return, you have to enter your PIN or password to get past the lock screen. Let’s explore these five methods.

This is for smartphones and devices using Windows 10

Dilbert and Virus
Copyright Scott Adams, Inc./Distributed by Universal Uclick for UFS

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Method 1 – Use the Start Menu

First, click the Start button. Next, select your account name. Now, click the Lock option. Refer to below image:

Lock PC 4
Lock your device from the Start Menu

Method 2 – Use the Keyboard

The Lock Shortcut

Hit the Windows+L key on your keyboard to lock your device.

The Combination Key

Press Ctrl+Alt+Del keys. Next, click the Lock option in the menu that appears.

Method 3 – Use a Desktop Icon

If you’d rather lock your PC with just a click, you can create a desktop icon.

First, right-click on your desktop. Now, hover over the New option. Next, click the Shortcut option. See below image:

Lock PC 1
Create a desktop shortcut to lock your device

The Create Shortcut window will be displayed. Now, type the following command in the Type the location of the item text box. Once you have entered the command, click Next.

Rundll32.exe user32.dll,LockWorkStation

See following image:

LOck PC 2
Entering the Lock command

Now, enter an icon name like “Lock PC”. Next, click Finish. Refer to below image:

Lock PC 3
Naming your shortc ut

Your icon will appear on your desktop. Just double-click it any time to lock your device.

Method 4 – Use the Screen Saver

Another method is to set your PC to lock after the Screen Saver has been on for a certain length of time. First, type in screen saver in the Cortana search box. Next, click Change screen saver in the search results at upper left hand corner of your screen. See below image:

Lock PC 5
Accessing the Screen Saver

In the Screen Saver menu, checkmark the box labeled On Resume, display logon screen option. Now, use the arrow buttons in the Wait box to select how many minutes should pass before your device locks. Next, to save your change click Apply. See following image:

Lock PC 6
Setting your Screen Saver to lock your device

For security reasons, it is best to use another method to lock your device before you step away from it.

Method 5 – Use Dynamic Lock

Dynamic Lock is a feature that automatically locks your PC after you step away from it. It does this by detecting the strength of the Bluetooth signal. When the signal drops, Windows 10 assumes you have left the immediate area of your PC and locks it for you.

This is a nifty feature and my favorite. You just walk away from your PC with your smartphone in hand and let the Dynamic Lock feature lock your PC.

Setup the Smartphone

To use Dynamic Lock, you will first need to pair your smartphone with your PC.

To do this:

On your smartphone, go to Settings > Bluetooth and enable the toggle. Refer to below image:

Lock PC 7
Enabling Bluetooth on your smartphone
Setup the PC

On your PC, go to Settings (the gear icon) > Devices > Bluetooth and Other devices.

Now, click Add Bluetooth or other device. Next, select your phone, confirm the PIN, and they will be paired. See below image:

1 LOck PC 8
Accessing Add a Device

Next, close Settings and relaunch the app. Now, go to Accounts > Sign-in options. Scroll down to the Dynamic Lock section. Next, checkmark the box labeled Allow Windows to automatically lock Your device when you’re away option. See following image where Raymond’s Phone is paired:

Lock PC 9
Enabling Dynamic Lock

I hope you have found this post helpful. If so, click the Tweet icon below. This will launch Twitter where you click its icon to post the Tweet.

I have found TechSavvy.Life blog posts extremely helpful. Check them out for posts on smart phone apps, Macs and PCs!

The following is a previous Twitter feed so you can view how a Tweet will be displayed.

I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath