How to Create a Restore Point and Recover in Windows 10

Has Windows been acting flaky? It could be a specific piece of software that’s wreaking havoc on your system. Maybe you have installed a new application or driver. Perhaps Windows is crashing or blue screening and you have no idea why. Do not worry because all is not lost if you have a system Restore Point waiting to roll your PC back to functionality.

Has Windows been acting flaky? It could be a specific piece of software that’s wreaking havoc on your system. Maybe you have installed a new application or driver. Perhaps Windows is crashing or blue screening and you have no idea why. Do not worry because all is not lost if you have a system Restore Point waiting to roll your PC back to functionality.

This is for devices running Windows 10. Also works for Windows 8 and 7. Screenshots are from Windows 10

click Turn on System Protection.
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A Restore Point is essentially a snapshot of Windows at any given time. You can create restore points on a regular basis, and if Windows ever breaks, you can bring it back to a point from before the problem occurred. The best part of using this method over a Recovery Drive is that only system files and settings will be affected, while all your documents and personal files will be left untouched.

Windows automatically creates a Restore Point, if enabled, at key moments, such as when you install certain software programs and drivers or apply Windows updates. However, you should manually create these points yourself on a regular basis, perhaps once a month, to ensure that your system can be restored to a recent state in the event of a mishap. You should also create one before you attempt any type of major change to Windows that could inadvertently lead to unstable behavior or other issues.

Create a Automatic Restore Point

First, locate the Restore Point utility by clicking Start and entering the text “restore” (without quotes) in the Cortana search box located next to Start. Refer to below image:

Restore A
Entering the Restore search criteria in Cortana search boc

Next, click your search result, Create a restore point, in upper left-hand corner. See below image:

Restore 1
Selecting the Control Panel applet to Create a Restore Point

Now, you will be taken to the System Protection tab of the System Properties window.

If System Protection has not yet been enabled, the Create button is grayed out. In this case, select the drive you want to protect and then click the Configure button.

If System Protection is enabled for a drive, highlight the drive and click the Configure button. See following image:

Restore 3
Selecting a drive to Configure

Next, click the Turn on System Protection radio button if not enabled. You will now need to decide how much disk space you want to devote to all your restore points. If you run out of space, the oldest restore points will start getting deleted. If you have ample free space, then you may want to devote more storage for the restore points. Otherwise, you can stick with the suggested percentage, usually anywhere from 1% to 3% depending on the overall size of the drive or move the slider to the percentage you want. Once set, click OK. Refer to below image:

Restore 3
Configuring the drive and amount of storage space for a Restore Point

Your restore points will be created automatically at certain key moments. You can repeat these steps if you have other drives that you wish to protect. You can also return to this screen in the future to delete all existing system restore points if you are running low on disk space. To do this, click the Delete button and click Continue to confirm the deletion.

Create a Manual Restore Point

Head back to the Configure screen (second image above). This time, highlight an available drive and click the Create button. See below image:

Restore 5
Selecting to create a manual Restore Point

Next, type in a name for the restore point. Since the current date and time will automatically be added to the name, you might want to include a note about the action you are about to take or another reason for the restore point. If you have multiple drives, include the drive name or letter in the name. Now, click the Create button. See following image:

Restore 6
Assigning a name for the Restore Point

Windows will tell you if the restore point was created successfully. Now, click the Close button. Refer to below image:

Restore 8
Pop-up message indicating the success of creating a Restore Point

You can repeat the above steps if you want to create a restore point for your other drives. When done, click OK to shut down the System Protection window

Restore to a Previous State

If you have an issue, you can return to the System Protection window and click the System Restore button. See below image:

Restore 9
Selecting the System Restore button

At the Restore system files and settings screen, Windows explains what System Restore does. Click Next to continue. See following image:

Restore 7
Verbage screen about the Restore

Now, select a drive restore point, then click the Scan for affected programs button. Refer to below image:

Restore 10
Selecting Scan for affected programs button

Windows scans for any applications that were added since the last restore point in order to delete them and looks for any that were removed in order to restore them. It also scans for any programs and drivers that might be restored but may not work correctly and may need to be reinstalled. Note the results if Windows finds anything important. After the scan completes, click Close to return to the previous System Restore window. See below image:

Restore 11a
Displaying the results (if any) of the scan. PAY CLOSE ATTENTION to this screen!

Make sure the restore point you want to use is selected. Now, click Next. See following image:

Restore 11
Continuing the Restore

Windows will display a Confirm your restore point window. Next, click the Finish button. Refer to below image:

Restore 12
Confirming your Restore. PAY CLOSE ATTENTION to this screen!

You will be told that the System Restore cannot be interrupted. Next, click Yes to continue. See below image:

Restore 13
One last chance to back out of the Restore. PAY CLOSE ATTENTION to this screen!

Windows will bring your system back to the restore point you selected and reboot, telling you that your files and settings are being restored. Once Windows is back up again, you can log back in. 

Next, you should receive a pop-up screen regarding the success of the Restore. You may now need to reinstall any applications, drivers, or other software that were removed. You will also want to play around in Windows to see if the problem that prompted you to restore it has been eliminated.

You are now finished. Now you know how to create a system Restore Point for all your hard drives and restore your system to a previous state. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

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How to Turn On Safer Browsing in Google Chrome

Google has some built-in tools in Chrome that attempt to make browsing safer. Enhanced Safe Browsing is one such tool.

With Safe Browsing, you get alerts about malware, risky extensions, phishing, or sites on Google’s list of potentially unsafe sites.

Google has some built-in tools in Chrome that attempt to make browsing safer. Enhanced Safe Browsing is one such tool. Let’s explore how to turn on this feature.

This is for the desktop version of Chrome and Android. Screenshots are from Chrome on Windows 10.

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Enhanced Safe Browsing Explained

Safe Browsing is a list of dangerous URLs that is maintained by Google and used to protect users from malicious sites. Enhanced Safe Browsing builds upon this feature with some additional tools.

With Enhanced Safe Browsing enabled, Chrome shares even more browsing data with Google. This allows for threat assessments to be more accurate and proactive, though it does present a privacy concern in itself. You are letting Google monitor your browsing.

Per Google’s description, Enhanced Safe Browsing enables the following:

  • It predicts and warns you about dangerous events before they happen.
  • It keeps you safe on Chrome and may be used to improve your security in other Google apps when you are signed in.
  • It improves security for you and everyone on the web.
  • It warns you if passwords are exposed in a data breach.

Enable This Feature

The feature is available for Chrome on the desktop and Android. It is not available for iPhone and iPad. The process for enabling it is very similar on both platforms.

First, launch Chrome. Next, select the three-dot menu (the hamburger) icon in the top-right corner of Chrome. Now, choose Settings from the menu. Refer to below image:

Selecting Settings

Next, go to the Privacy and Security section. See below image:

Accessing Privacy and security option

Now, on the desktop, click Security. On the Android, it is called Safe Browsing. See following image:

Browsing 3
Accessing the Security option

Next, click or tap on the radio button to enable Enhanced protection. Refer to below image:

Enabling Enhanced protection

Now, exit Settings. You are finished. You will not notice anything different in your everyday browsing, but you will now have better protection. In the event that something is amiss, Google Chrome will give you a warning.

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How to Automatically Resume Apps on Startup in Windows 10

Have you ever been getting things done with a bunch of apps open then suddenly need to logout or restart your PC? It can be annoying when you log back in and having to restart all the apps you were using. For some good news, Windows 10 offers a switch in Settings that will resume select apps after logging out and back in again. This makes Windows remember which apps to reopen so you can resume where you left off.

Have you ever been getting things done with a bunch of apps open then suddenly need to logout or restart your PC? It can be annoying when you log back in and having to restart all the apps you were using. For some good news, Windows 10 offers a switch in Settings that will resume select apps after logging out and back in again. This makes Windows remember which apps to reopen so you can resume where you left off.

This is for devices running Windows 10

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This feature works with most modern apps like Office, Edge, other apps you have downloaded from the Microsoft Store, or those apps considered restartable. It might not work with legacy desktop apps like Photoshop, for example. Still this is a nice feature, so let’s explore how this is done.

First, open Settings by clicking the Start menu and select the small gear icon, or press Windows+I. Refer to below image:

Resume 1
Accessing Settings

Next, in the Settings screen, click on Accounts. See below image:

Resume 2
Accessing Accounts

Now, on the Accounts screen, click Sign-in options in the sidebar. See following image:

Resume 3
Accessing Sign-in options

In Sign-in options, scroll down the page until you see the Restart apps option. Toggle the switch just below it until it’s turned On.

Resume 4
Turning on Restart apps

Now, you may exit Settings.

The next time you log out and log back in, what Microsoft calls your “restartable apps” will be reloaded automatically.

These are its universal apps available through the Store. The Windows Store only includes apps written for Microsoft’s new “Universal Windows Platform,” or UWP.

Legacy apps (that use the Win32 API) written for Windows versions prior to Windows 8 may not be restarted automatically. Still, you may find this feature useful.

That’s it. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

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I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

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How to Force Chrome to Always Open Previously Open Tabs

Let’s say you are in the middle of a complex task in Chrome but you need to restart, log out, or Chrome has crashed. With one quick settings change, Chrome can remember all of your open tabs and reload them automatically the next time you start Chrome. Let’s explore how to setup this feature.

Let’s say you are in the middle of a complex task in Chrome but you need to restart, log out, or Chrome has crashed. With one quick settings change, Chrome can remember all of your open tabs and reload them automatically the next time you start Chrome. Let’s explore how to setup this feature.

This is for devices running Google Chrome. Screenshots are from Windows 10

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First, launch Chrome. In any window, click the three vertical dots button (the hamburger icon) in the upper right-hand corner and select Settings from the menu. Refer to below image:

Accessing Settings

Next, select On startup option in the sidebar. See below image:

Selecting On startup option

Now, in the On startup section, select the radio button beside Continue where you left off. See following image:

Enabling opening your previous tabs

You can also force Chrome to launch with a set of your favorite pages. In the same On startup page in Chrome Settings just select Open a specific page or set of pages instead. Refer to below image where you can open the browser to Chrome apps using the text of chrome://apps/.

Enabling open to a specific page

Here you will see your Google (and non Google) apps. Yes, you can add third party apps to your opening Chrome apps page. See below image:

Your Google apps screen

If you want Chrome to always open with a fresh, empty browser state, you can head back to this screen and select Open the New Tab page instead.

After that, close Settings, The next time you restart Chrome, all of your tabs will open again exactly where you left off.

Note! If you were browsing through Incognito (private mode) and you lose your tabs, Chrome will not remember them.

That’s it. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

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Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

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Deleting Microsoft Accounts Gets Man Two Years in Jail

This post is for information only, no screenshots. At the end of the main story, I added one of my own IT consultant stories.

This post is for information only, no screenshots. At the end of the main story, I added one of my own IT consultant stories.

This is for businesses

Source: Office Watch

A man has been jailed for two years after sabotaging a company by deleting 80% of their Microsoft 365 accounts; email, calendars, contact lists, docs, and so on. What did he do and what organizations should do to prevent a similar catastrophe.

Deepanshu Kher worked for an IT consultant firm and was deployed to work at Carlsbad Company who were migrating to Microsoft 365 hosting. Carlsbad were unhappy with Kher who eventually left both Carlsbad and the consultant firm.

He returned to India where he hacked into Carlsbad Company’s new Microsoft 365 system and deleted 1,200 of their 1,500 user accounts. That shut down the company for two days, unable to access email accounts, contacts, calendars, documents, directories plus Teams and video conferencing.

Customers and partners could not contact the company or vice-versa. There was no way to tell people what was happening and why.

It took three months and over half-a-million dollars for Carlsbad to get everything back into something like normal.

Lessons to be Learned

Details of the hack have not been disclosed but some reasonable guesses are possible with some preventative measures suggested. See end of this blog post for a link about the hack.

Revoke Accounts

When someone leaves an organization, especially admin level access, make sure their account privileges are suspended or revoked.  It’s easily overlooked.

A former employee or contractor might have discovered other logins or know hacks into a system but most commonly they just login to their account.

Restoring Deleted Accounts

Microsoft’s default for deleting a mailbox or user account is a ‘soft’ deletion that’s held in a recycle bin for 30 days, with a Restore option, before full deletion. Unfortunately, there’s a second ‘hard’ option which immediately deletes the entire mailbox or user account. In some cases, hard deletion is necessary but perhaps Microsoft should make irreversible deletions a lot more difficult to access, even by administrators? Maybe require more than one admin to approve hard deletions?

Where is the Hacker Now?

Mr Kher did his nasty deed from India but that didn not stop the FBI from tracking him down and issuing an arrest warrant. When he tried to re-enter the US in January 2021 he was arrested, unaware of the outstanding warrant.

In US District Court he was found guilty of “Intentional Damage to a Protected Computer ” which carries a 10 year and $250,000 fine maximum. Kher was sentenced to two years jail, three years supervised release and ordered to pay restitution of $567,084 (the precise amount it cost Carlsbad to fix their systems).

See Justice.gov for details.

One of my Personal IT Consultant Jobs

I went to work thru a consultant agency for a manufacturing plant in the Port of Catoosa near Tulsa, Oklahoma. On my first day, around 9am, the admin person starting setting me up access to their system. Two hours later, he was still working; he did not know how to set my credentials. Also, a lady supervisor came by and gave me a foot high stack of paper and told me to go through it. I ask, “what am I looking for?”. She said, “just go through it.” Then she left. I did not do this; if she did not know what I was looking for, I sure did not know.

Around 11:am, the IT director came by and wanted to take me to lunch. His right-hand partner, he and I got into his vehicle. They did not ask me any questions on the ride to the restaurant or back to the company. During lunch, they did not even acknowledge my presence or ask me anything. They just talked to each other. So, I remained silent. I thought this was strange.

Back at the plant, he took me to several departments where I met a lot of people, names I could not remember. What I later realized, it was a “dog and pony” show. He was being pressured to do something about their IT “system”, so he talked to my consulting agency and they sent me. He expected me to fix their “system”. He knew this was an impossible task for one person; he set me up for failure.

Over the next two days, I was amazed at their “system”. Their plant was using Excel spreadsheets to run the company; I found thousands of them. I estimated 10,000 spreadsheets.

One department would enter info like name, supervisor, hours worked. Then that department would “pass” the spreadsheet to the next department where they added their own info and/or creating new Excel spreadsheets. And so it went to each department. It was a gigantic mess. I wrote him a letter saying he needed an enterprise system like SAP, IBM or Accenture. He ignored the letter. He had done his job by hiring me to be his savior.

I decided to start with the Time Keeping system. I create a database and the forms. At least, they could have something to visualize.

No one spoke to me. I tried to talk to the guys in IT, but they shut the door in my face. Very wierd.

After ten days, I came in on a Monday morning and starting working. Around 10:00am a supervisor comes by and says, “why are you hear, you were fired on Friday”. I said, “no one told me”. She left and I called my boss. They did not know either. I packed what work I had done and left.

After reading the main story above, I could have done major damage to the company by deleting thousands of Excel spreadsheets in a matter of minutes. I had full admin access. So, would I have been sentenced to jail? I do not think so because I was technically fired and no one told me or my boss. The company was to blame for their lack of communication and not revoking my credentials. So, pay attention to the above story, especially, if you are running a business.

That’s it. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

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I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Change Google Assistant’s Voice

If you use the Google Assistant often, you might be getting tired of hearing the Assistant reply in the same voice. Fortunately, Google realized their customers wanted voice options for their devices, and introduced the ability to change your Assistant’s voice some time ago; and added a few surprise options.

If you use the Google Assistant often, you might be getting tired of hearing the Assistant reply in the same voice. Fortunately, Google realized their customers wanted voice options for their devices, and introduced the ability to change your Assistant’s voice some time ago; and added a few surprise options.

With a few simple steps, you can change the voice on all of your Google-powered devices, including your Chromebook and smartphones. Here’s the simple guide on how to change the Google Assistant’s voice.

This is for smartdevices using Google. Screenshots are from iPhone XR

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First, open the Google Assistant app from your iPhone App Library. Hold, swipe right, and release using the Dots bar at the bottom or swipe left all the way to open the App Library. Refer to below image:

Voice 1
Using the Dots bar

Next, at the top of your screen you will see a Search box. See below image:

Voicd 2
The App Library screen

Now, in the Search bar, type in google assistant and tap the app to open. See following image:

Voicd 3
The Google Assistant app

Here you will see a list of things you can do with the app. Locate the Assistant voice option and tap it. Refer to below image:

Voice 4
The Assistant Voice option

The default voice will be displayed, usually Red. At the bottom of your screen you will see the list of devices supporting this voice. See below image:

Voice 5
Selecting the Red voice, the default

To change the voice setting, just swipe the Dots bar to highlight one or tap a color bubble to hear a voice sample. After your selection, that voice will remain as your Google Assistant Voice setting. See following image;

Voicd 6
Selecting the Amber voice

Google Assistant also has the option to assume a variety of celebrity voices, giving you some very unique options for your voice assistant. The range of celebrity voices available continues to grow, but popular options currently include John Legend and Issa Rae.

You may have found the celebrity voice options when looking at the voice settings we mentioned earlier, but there’s an, easier way to give your Google Home a celebrity voice. All you have to do is say, “Hey Google, talk like John Legend,” or whoever you prefer, and the voice assistant will address you in that voice until you tell it otherwise. All voices are not available in all areas.

Now, exit the Assistant. That’s it. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

Just click the Tweet icon below. This will launch Twitter where you click its icon to post the Tweet.

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Check out TechSavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs, and Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Easily Open Chrome to Incognito Mode

If you do not want Google Chrome to remember your activity, you can browse the web privately in Incognito mode.

If you do not want Google Chrome to remember your activity, you can browse the web privately in Incognito mode.

It is easy to quickly open an Incognito window using a keyboard shortcut. Lets explore how to do this.

This is devices running Google Chrome

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First, open Chrome. Next, with any Chrome browser window open, press the following keyboard combination to open a new Incognito window:

  • Windows, Linux, or Chrome OS: Press Ctrl + Shift + N.
  • Mac: Press ⌘ + Shift + N.

After pressing the keyboard shortcut, a special Incognito window will open. If you want to block third-party cookies, just toggle the switch to On, the default setting. Refer to below image:

Incognito 1
Your Incognito window

Whenever you are in Incognito mode, you will be able to tell because the Chrome browser window’s toolbar will have a darker color scheme and there will be a small Incognito icon beside the address bar in the toolbar. See below image:

Incognito 2
The icon and text telling you are in Incognito mode

You can switch between Incognito windows and regular Chrome windows. You will only browse in private when you are using an Incognito window.

While browsing within an Incognito window, Chrome will not locally store your browsing history, site data, cookies, or saved form data once you close the Incognito window. However, downloaded files and bookmarks will be saved unless you manually remove them.

At any time, you can press Ctrl+T (or ⌘ + T on Mac) to open a new tab within the Incognito window, and browsing activity within that tab will be locally private as well.

Remember that Incognito mode is not perfect, and it does not protect you from those who might view your activity on the web remotely, such as your employer, school, ISP, or the websites you visit. It is only to prevent local snooping of your browsing history.

If you see a number next to the Incognito text at the top right, you have more than one Incognito window open. See following image:

Incognito 3
Your number of Incognito windows open

When you are ready to stop private browsing, you will need to close the Incognito window(s). To do so using a keyboard shortcut:

  • Windows, Linux, or Chrome OS: Press Alt + F4
  • Mac: Press ⌘ + Shift + W

Or you can just click the “X” in the corner of the window with your mouse.

That’s it. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter, as mentioned below.

I hope you have found this post helpful. If so, click the Tweet icon below. This will launch Twitter where you click its icon to post the Tweet.

Check out TechSavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs, and Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

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Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Auto-Delete Your Google History Activities

Google collects and remembers “tons” of information about your activity, including your web, search, YouTube, and location history. Google auto-deletes for new users after 18 months but it will remember history forever if you previously enabled this feature with the default options.

Google collects and remembers “tons” of information about your activity, including your web, search, YouTube, and location history. Google auto-deletes for new users after 18 months but it will remember history forever if you previously enabled this feature with the default options.

As an existing user, you have four options in making Google delete your data; after 36 months, 18 months, 3 months, or stop activity collection entirely. The options are buried in Google Settings.

This is for devices running Google. Screenshots are from iPhone XR

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Note! Google uses this history to personalize your experience, including your web search results and recommendations. Deleting it will make your Google experience less “personalized.”

Let’s explore how to set up this auto-delete function..

Control Web and App Activity

First, launch Google and tap your profile photo. Refer to below image:

Google 1
Launch Google

Now, tap the Google Account settings option See below image:

Google 2
Accessing Google Account option

Next, scroll down to Privacy & personalization section and tap Manage your data & personalization. See following image:

Google 3
Accessing your data and personalization link

Now, scroll down to Activity controls section. Here, tap the Web & App Activity option. Refer to below image:

Google 4
Accessing your Web & App Activity section

Next, toggle to On the Web & App Activity toggle. Next, tap the Auto-delete (Off) switch to turn in On. See below image:

Enabling Auto-delete by its link

Now, select one of four options. See following image where I selected Auto -delete activity older than 18 months and tap the Next button:

Google 6
Selecting one of four options for Auto-delete

A Confirmation screen will be displayed. Just tap the Confirm button in lower right-hand corner. Refer to below image:

Google 7
Confirming your selection

Now, you will see a Preference saved dialog box. Just tap Got It text in lower right-hand corner. See below image:

Google 8
Saving your preference

Control Location and YouTube Activity

Next, go back to Activity controls section and repeat above steps for Location History and YouTube History.

Let’s say you Search, read articles, watch videos, or see photos on ‘drones’. Google will send out ad links for ‘drones’, this is called ‘ad personalization’. Through these sponsored ads is one way Google makes money. You can turn off these ads but at the expense of a ‘depersonalization experience’.

Control Ad Personalization

Now, go back to Activity controls and scroll down a little till you see the Ad personalization section and tap the Go to ad settings link. See following image:

Google 9
Selecting your ad settings link

Next, toggle the Ad personalization switch to ON. Refer to below image:

Google 10
Enabling your Ad personalization

Here you will see a listing of companies/others who are using ad personalization. See below image where I selected WooCommerce:

Google 11
Selecting a targeted ad

Now, you will be presented a dialog box to Turn off or Close. Next, tap the Turn off button to no longer see this company/others targeted ads. See following image:

Google 12
Turning off your targeted ad

Now, a confirmation dialog box appears where you have to tap the Turn off button again. Google makes you go through ‘hoops’ to reduce their ads. Refer to below image:

Google 12
Your confirmation for turning off the targeted ad

Really, Turn Off Ads?

Google is making you go through a myriad of selections. Notice the text that states turning off your selected ad will stay off for at least 90 days. Your selected ad will stay off for this period, then guess what, the ad comes back! Google wants to make money off these ads; they do not want you to turn them off. See above image.

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How to Spell Check Outlook Emails Before Sending

Nobody wants their communications to have spelling errors left in, so let Microsoft Outlook help by automatically spell checking emails before they are sent.

Nobody wants their communications to have spelling errors left in, so let Microsoft Outlook help by automatically spell checking emails before they are sent. Of course you can manually check before sending by opening an Outlook email and head to:

Review > Spelling & Grammar

But who wants to do this for every email you send. Instead, the Microsoft Outlook desktop client has a setting that forces spell check to take place after you click the Send button. If no errors are found, the email is sent like normal. If a spelling error is found, Outlook gives you the option to correct it before the email is sent.

This is for PCs running Outlook

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To enable this feature, open the Outlook desktop application and click:

File > Options

Refer to below image:

Outlook 1
Accessing Options

Next. in the Mail > Compose Messages section, toggle on the Always check spelling before sending checkbox. See below image:

Outlook 2
Enabling Spell Check

Now, click OK in the bottom-right corner to save and close the Options panel. See following image:

Outlook 1
Saving your change

Now, when we click Send on an email with a spelling error, Microsoft Outlook will pick it up and give you the chance to change it. Refer to below image:

Outlook 4
Spell Check in action

If the spell checker has found a misspelled word and you want to change it, click Cancel. Or, you could use one of its suggestions. See below image where “Savvy” is misspelled:

Outlook 5
Cancel your email

If you choose to cancel, a dialog box will open that lets you quit sending the email. Click No to stop the email from being sent. See following image:

Outlook 6
Cancel sending your email

Note! The spell checker will not pick up the wrong words, just words that are spelled incorrectly. So, if you meant to type in “Savvy” but instead typed “Savoy”, the spell checker will not pick that up because “Savoy” is a correctly spelled word.

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I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Block Fact Checkers and Gate Keepers On Facebook

Have you received the message “This post has been removed for misinformation… or deemed inappropriate….” on Facebook. Just who are these Facebook “Police”?

Who you goin to call, Fact Checkers? A ‘play on words’ from the movie ‘Ghostbusters’.

Have you received the message “This post has been removed for misinformation… or deemed inappropriate….” on Facebook. Just who are these Facebook “Police”?

You will be surprised at the number of people who use ‘fact checker’ or ‘gate keeper’ as their name

Facebook has partnered with independent third-party fact-checkers globally who are certified through the non-partisan International Fact-Checking Network (ICFN). This fact-checking program launched in 2016, and has continued to expand it since then to cover more languages and countries.

The focus of this program is to address viral misinformation; provably false claims, particularly those that have the potential to mislead or harm.

Fact-checking partners are able to review content across both Facebook and Instagram, including organicand boosted posts. They can also review videos, images, links or text-only posts.

There are a lot of guides on the Internet that tell you to block ‘fact checker’ from the Facebook block user function. However, all this does is block users and pages that call themselves ‘fact checker’. Facebook does not actually disclose who and where the ‘fact checker’ actually are, so blocking random pages named ‘fact checker’ won’t really do much. The same goes for ‘gate keeper’.

So, this post is just for fun and informational. You are unable to actually block a Facebook ‘fact checker’ or ‘gate keeper’. With that said, let’s explore how to block people who call themselves ‘fact checker’ or ‘gatekeeper’.

This is for devices running Facebook

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Who Are Fact Checkers

Source: Facebook

Since we do not believe that a private company like Facebook should be the arbiters of truth, we rely on independent fact-checkers to identify and review potential misinformation, which enables us to take action.

  1. Identify: We identify potential misinformation using a variety of signals, and our fact-checking partners can also proactively identify content on their own.
  2. Review: Fact-checkers review and rate the accuracy of stories through original reporting, including interviewing primary sources, consulting public data, and conducting analyses of media, including photos and video.
  3. Act: Once we have a rating from a fact-checking partner, we take action by ensuring that fewer people see that misinformation by surfacing fact-check articles to users across our platforms and showing labels on top of false stories.

Who Are Gate Keepers

Source: Slate

Facebook Oversight Board is their gatekeeper. A gatekeeper decides what is free speech or not. The board will act much like a court of appeals for the platform, and it will take on cases regarding how to handle controversial content on Facebook and Instagram. The board will also act in an advisory capacity, giving policy recommendations to the company.

Block a Fact Checker

First, launch Facebook and tap the Menu icon. Refer to below image:

FC 1
Accessing Facebook menu

Now, scroll down and open the Settings and Privacy section and tap Settings. See below image:

FC 2
Accessing Facebook settings

Next, scroll down to the Blocking section and tap it. See following image:

FC 3
Accessing the Blocking section

Next, tap the link Add to blocked list. Refer to below image:

FC 4
Accessing the Add to blocked list link

At the top of the page, in the Search box, type in: fact checker. Here you will see a long list of people using the name of ‘fact checker’. See below image:

FC 5
Entering Fact Checker in the Search box

Next, tap a listing or the Block icon and you will be given a dialog box to Block or Cancel. Tap the Block icon. That person will be added to your Blocked People list. See following image:

FC 6
Blocking a Fact Checker

Now, repeat the above for each ‘fact checker’ person you want to block. Next, in the Search box, type in: fact checkers. Here you will see another long list of people using the name of ‘fact checkers’. Next, tap a listing or the Block icon. Tap the Block icon and repeat for each person in the list as needed.

Block a Gate Keeper

Go back to the Search box and type in: gate keeper. Here you will see a long list of people using the name of ‘gate keeper’. Refer to below image:

FC 7
Entering Gate Keeper in the Search box

Next, tap a listing or the Block icon you will be given a dialog box to Block or Cancel. Tap the Block icon. See below image:

FC 8
Blocking a Gate Keeper

Repeat the above for a search of ‘gate keepers’ and block as needed. Next, tap the back button to see your Blocked People list that includes ‘fact checker’, ‘fact checkers’, ‘gate keeper’ and/or ‘gate keepers’. Why do people use such names? See following image:

FC 9
Your Blocked People list

Now, tap all the way back using the Back button and exit Facebook.

I hope you learned something about the Facebook ‘Police’. We did. Well, that’s it. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

Just click the Tweet icon below. This will launch Twitter where you click its icon to post the Tweet.

Check out TechSavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs or Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath