How to Add Drop Cap Using Online Pictures in Word

If you want even more flair with your Microsoft Word drop cap letters, why not take advantage of the Microsoft online images.

RAYMOND OGLESBY @RaymondOglesby2
February 3, 2022

If you want even more flair with your Microsoft Word drop cap letters, why not take advantage of the Microsoft online images. Let’s explore how this is done.

This is for devices using Microsoft Word

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First, open Word and click where you want a drop cap letter to appear and navigate to

Insert | Pictures | Online Pictures

Next, you will see the Online Pictures box. Search for the letter you want to use (e.g. type “R” into the Search for box and hit Enter). Simply select your image and click Insert. Refer to the below image:

Drop Cap 1
The letter “R” Drop Caps

The letter may appear very large or very small within your document, so resize it if necessary.

Now, right-click the image of your letter to format it. For example, Crop the image slightly, setting Wrap Text to ‘tight’ or ‘square’. See the below image:

Drop Cap 2
Selecting omg options for the Drop Cap

Next, you will see your drop cap in your Word document. See the following image:

Drop Cap 3
Your finished Drop Cap

Quote For the Day

The key is not to prioritize what’s on your schedule, but to schedule your priorities.

Stephen Covey

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The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong Vietnam: Events and Aftermath

How to Spell Check in Word Using Keyboard Shortcuts

You may already be familiar with Microsoft Word’s built-in spelling and grammar checker, flagging incorrect spelling, and (sometimes) bad grammar. If you are reviewing a document that’s riddled with errors, you can use these keyboard shortcuts to speed up the process.

RAYMOND OGLESBY @RaymondOglesby2
January 20, 2022
Updated: January 21, 2022

You may already be familiar with Microsoft Word’s built-in spelling and grammar checker, flagging incorrect spelling, and (sometimes) bad grammar. If you are reviewing a document that’s riddled with errors, you can use these keyboard shortcuts to speed up the process. Let’s explore using these shortcuts.

This is for devices using Microsoft Word

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What the Checker Can and Can Not Do

Word’s spelling and grammar checker is enabled by default. When a word is misspelled, Word flags it with a wavy, red underline. When there’s incorrect grammar or formatting, Word flags it with two blue underlines. Refer to the below image:

Spelling and Grammar example

In the above example, Word detected two spaces between “Raymond” and “Oglesby,” so it flagged it as a grammar issue. It also detected “specialist” was misspelled as “specialis,” so it flagged that as a spelling error.

These are the basics that Word checks for by default. However, you can make Word’s spelling and grammar checker work harder by enabling some additional features in its Settings menu. Head to:

File > Options > Proofing > Settings

For example, you can have Word check for passive voice, split infinitives, superfluous expressions, and so on. See the below image:

Grammar Settings

If you scroll down, you can check for more grammar options, such as Inclusiveness:

Grammar 1
More Grammar settings

You can also do things like, exclude specific words from the checker, check for inclusive language, ignore URLs, and much more.

So what can Word’s spelling and grammar checker not do? As comprehensive as it may seem, it often fails when it comes to noticing the incorrect usage of a properly spelled word. For example, “troubleshoot.” See the following image:

Grammar error

In this case, Word failed to catch the incorrect usage of “troubleshoot,” it should be “troubleshot.” That said, you can count on Word to detect a lot of issues in a document, but you can not rely on it 100%. As a matter of good practice, always re-review your document before sending it out.

Using the Keyboard Shortcut

In Word, you can use the Alt+F7 shortcut to jump straight to the first error behind where the cursor currently is in the document. So, if you want to start with the first error, you will need to place your cursor at the beginning of the document, or in front of the first error. Refer to the below image:

Spelling error

When you press Alt+F7, Word highlights the spelling or grammar error and gives you the option to either correct or ignore the issue. Press the up or down arrow keys to highlight the desired option, and then press Enter to select it.

Note! you can only highlight spelling and grammar suggestions with your arrow keys. If you want to ignore the suggestion, you must click that option with your mouse. See the below image:

Word 5A
Highlight the Spelling error

Spelling errors generally have more suggested corrections to choose from. See the following image:

Correction for the Spelling error

You can also ignore the spelling error, just as you would with the grammar error. The only difference is, with spelling, you can choose to:

  • Ignore every instance of that same error
  • Ignore just the specific error (even if it also exists elsewhere in the document)

Refer to the below image:

Ignore the Spelling error

In addition, you can also add that word to the dictionary. When you do this, Word will no longer flag the word as an error. This is useful if the word happens to be a part of an in-house style guide or something similar.

Click the three dots to the right of Ignore All and then click Add to Dictionary from the drop-down menu. See the below image:

Word
Add to the Dictionary

When you are ready to move on to the next error, just press Alt+F7 again. Continue doing this until all of the issues within the document have been checked.

Word’s grammar and spell checker is very useful for reviewing the content within a document, but it can be quite distracting when it’s throwing back errors while you are writing. If it’s too distracting for you, you can turn it off as you type.

Quote For the Day

Synergy is what happens when one plus one equals ten or a hundred or even a thousand! It’s the profound result when two or more respectful human beings determine to go beyond their preconceived ideas to meet a great challenge.

Stephen Covey

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I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love to hear from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app, and version you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

Author’s E-book

You can access the e-book from a Kindle device, the Kindle App for the desktop or smartphone, which is a free app.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong Vietnam: Events and Aftermath

How to Overlay Images in Microsoft Word

Working with images in Microsoft Word is not necessarily difficult, but there are some tricks to positioning your pictures. If you have two or more images that you want to overlap with each other, this post will show you how.

RAYMOND OGLESBY @RaymondOglesby2
January 13, 2022

Working with images in Microsoft Word is not necessarily difficult, but there are some tricks to positioning your pictures. If you have two or more images that you want to overlap with each other, this post will show you how.

This is for devices using Microsoft Word

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Adjust Image Layout

First, launch Microsoft Word and insert an image. You must be sure you are using a supported layout option. You can check this in three different ways.

  • Select the image and click the Layout Options icon that appears to the right of it.
  • Select the image, go to the Picture Format tab that appears, and click the Wrap Text drop-down arrow.
  • Right-click the image and move your cursor to Wrap Text to display the options in the pop-out menu.

Refer to the below image :

Overlap 1
Selecting Wrap Text option

Next, as to layout options, select Square, Tight, Through, or one of the others; whichever works best for your document. Note! In Line with Text will not work. See the below image:

Overlap 2
Selecting a Layout

Allow Images to Overlap

Now, you may notice when you drag an image close to another in your Word document, you cannot place it on top of another. The other picture may suddenly move out of the way to make room for the one you are dragging.

In order to overlay images in Word, you need to enable this option for each picture you want in the group.

  • Select the image, click the Layout Options icon on the right, and click See More at the bottom.
  • Select the image, go to the Picture Format tab, click Position, and pick More Layout Options.

See the following image:

Overlap 3
Selecting See more options

Next, when the Layout window opens, you should be on the Position tab. But if not, select it. At the bottom of the window below Options, check the box to Allow Overlap, then click OK. Refer to the below image:

Overlap 4
Enabling Allow overlap

Now, insert another image(s) and place it next to or below the original image. Make sure you enable the overlap option for each image that you want to overlay.

Overlay Images

Once all of the above is in place, simply drag your images and overlap them as you please.

If you want a particular picture to be on top, right-click or go to the Picture Format tab and choose to Bring Forward or Bring to Front depending on the number of images you are using and how you want them positioned. See the below image:

Overlap 5
Selecting Bring to Front option

You can take similar action if you want an image in the back. Right-click or go to the Picture Format tab and choose to Send Backward or Send to Back. See the following image:

Overlay 6
Selecting Send to Back option

Next, your final overlapped images will look similar to the below image where we are using the Bring to Front option:

Overlay 7
The finished overlapping images

Overlapping images in Word is not too hard, as you can see. But it’s one of those hidden tricks that can make working with pictures much easier just like placing text on top of an image. I wish I knew about this trick before now.

Quote For the Day

Listen with the intent to understand, not the intent to reply.

Stephen Covey

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I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love to hear from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app, and version you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

Author’s E-book

You can access the e-book from a Kindle device, the Kindle App for the desktop or smartphone, which is a free app.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong Vietnam: Events and Aftermath

How to Add a Signature to Microsoft Word

Adding your signature into a Microsoft Word document is a way to put your own stamp on it and make it look official and professional.

RAYMOND OGLESBY @RaymondOglesby2
October 14, 2021

Adding your signature into a Microsoft Word document is a way to put your own stamp on it and make it look official and professional. Let’s explore how this is done.

This is for devices running Word. We are using Word for Microsoft 365 on Windows 10.

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There are several ways to add your signature to a Word document. You can add a signature line for a post-print signature, or insert your own handwritten signature as a picture.

Add a Signature Line

A Signature Line provides you, or somebody else, with a location to sign a printed document. If you are planning on printing your Word document, adding a Signature Line is probably the easiest way.

First, open a Word document. In the Text section, click

Insert > Signature Line

Refer to below image:

Signature 1
Selecting Signature Line option

Next, in the Signature Setup box that appears, fill out your signature details. You can include the name, title, and email address of the signer. This can be you or somebody else.

You can also provide instructions for the signer. Once you are ready, click OK to insert your Signature Line. See below image:

Signature 2
Setting up Signature details

Now, once you have confirmed your signature options, a Signature Line is inserted with a cross and a line to signify where to sign. See following image:

Signature 3
Your Signature Line

You can now drag-and-drop this into an appropriate position within your Word document. The document can then be signed at this position after printing.

Add a Picture Signature

If you would prefer to use your handwritten signature, you can take a picture or scan a copy of it and upload it to your computer. You can then insert a picture of your signature into the Word document.

First, place your cursor where you want to locate the signature, preferably just below the Signature Line box.

To insert the image into your document, click

Insert > Pictures > This Device

Your File Explorer will open for you to choose your signature image, then click Insert. Highlight your Signature Line box, and click the Layout Options icon. From here, choose the Layout Option, In Front of Text.

Signature 4
Selecting In Front of Text for Layout Option

Next, drag-and-drop your signature picture onto the Signature Line. See below image:

Signature 5
Your final result

Optionally, following the above steps, you could add a photo below or to the side of your Signature Line box.

Quote For the Day

People are always asking for the latest developments in the unification of this theory with that theory, and they don’t give us a chance to tell them anything about one of the theories that we know pretty well. They always want to know things that we don’t know.

Richard P Feynman

That’s it. You now know how to add a signature into a Word document. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

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I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong Vietnam: Events and Aftermath

How to Add the Developer Tab in Office Apps

Sooner or later, you will need the Developer Tab in Word, Excel, PowerPoint, or Outlook. Even if you know nothing about programming, there are buttons on the Developer tab that are necessary for some of the clever features in Office.

RAYMOND OGLESBY @RaymondOglesby2
September 28, 2021

Sooner or later, you will need the Developer Tab in Word, Excel, PowerPoint, or Outlook. Even if you know nothing about programming, there are buttons on the Developer tab that are necessary for some of the clever features in Office.

The Developer tab is not displayed by default, but you can add it to the ribbon in a few easy steps.

This is for devices running Microsoft Office

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First, open an Office app, like Word, and any document. Now, right-click within any Tab in the Ribbon and select Customize the Ribbon. Refer to below image:

Ribbon 1
Select Customize the Ribbon option

Next, in the right-hand side, select All Tabs from the drop down menu and simply checkmark the Developer tab box. Now, select OK to enable the Developer tab. See below image:

Ribbon 2
Enable the Developer tab

Next, exit your Office app, restart the app and load your document. You will see the Developer tab in your ribbon. Just click the tab to view its options. See following image:

Ribbon 3
Your Developer tab

Quote For the Day

‘Fahrenheit 451’ postulates a lot of things I didn’t want to have happen.

Ray Bradbury

That was easy. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

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I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong Vietnam: Events and Aftermath

How to Freely Move Pictures in Word

Whenever you insert a graphic into a document, it is inserted “in line with text” by default. This treats the object as if it were text, moving it around the page as text is inserted. You can enable text wrapping on an object to move it around freely, forcing the text to move around to accommodate it.

RAYMOND OGLESBY @RaymondOglesby2
August 24, 2021

Whenever you insert a graphic into a document, it is inserted “in line with text” by default. This treats the object as if it were text, moving it around the page as text is inserted. You can enable text wrapping on an object to move it around freely, forcing the text to move around to accommodate it. Let’s explore this feature.

This is for devices running Word

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Make Single Picture Moveable

First, open Microsoft Word on your Windows or Mac computer. On Word’s first screen, select Blank document to create a new document. Refer to below image:

Word 1
Open a blank Word document

Now, in Word’s editing window, click the Insert tab at the top. See below image:

Word 2
Click the Insert tab

Next, under the Illustrations section, click

Pictures > This Device

This lets you add a picture from your computer. See following image:

Word 3
Click This Device to locate a picture on your computer

Now, using your File Explorer, navigate to your picture. Double-click the picture to add it to your Word document. Refer to below image:

Word 4
Find a picture on File Explorer

Next, on Word’s editing screen, right-click the image that you just added and select

Wrap Text > In Front of Text

from the menu. See below image:

Word 5
Locate picture in Front of Text

Your picture is now freely movable. Drag and drop it anywhere you want in your document. See following image:

Word 6
The final result

Make All Pictures Moveable

If you would like to make all of your future pictures freely move in your Word documents, you can modify an option in Word’s Settings menu.

First, launch Microsoft Word on your Windows or Mac computer. Now, on Word’s main screen in the lower-left corner, click Options.

Note! If you are on Word’s document editing screen, instead, click File at the top to see Options.

Refer to below image:

Word 7
Select Options

Next, select Advanced in the sidebar on the left. See below image:

Word 8
Select Advanced

Now, scroll down the right pane to the Cut, copy, and paste section. Locate the Insert/paste picture as option and click the drop-down menu next to it. See following image:

Word 9
Locate drop down menu

Next, select In front of text option in the drop-down menu. Refer to below image:

Word 10
Select In front of text option

Now, click OK at the bottom of the Options window to save your changes and close the window. See below image:

Word 11
Save your changes and exit

From now on, Word will allow you to freely move pictures on top of text in your documents.

You might be thinking about spacing around your text. As is, with the picture being in front of your text, your text is hidden. One way to fix this is using the option Through or Top and bottom of the picture instead of choosing In front of text.

Quote For the Day

Science fiction is any idea that occurs in the head and doesn’t exist yet, but soon will, and will change everything for everybody, and nothing will ever be the same again. As soon as you have an idea that changes some small part of the world you are writing science fiction. It is always the art of the possible, never the impossible.

Ray Bradbury

You are finished on making pictures moveable in Word. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

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I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Use the Microsoft Measurement Converter

Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, and Outlook offer a hidden measurement converter to save you from doing measurement conversions manually. If you are working with a document, presentation, or email that contains measurements, you will find this time-saving feature useful.

RAYMOND OGLESBY @RaymondOglesby2
August 17, 2021

Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, and Outlook offer a hidden measurement converter to save you from doing measurement conversions manually. If you are working with a document, presentation, or email that contains measurements, you will find this time-saving feature useful. Lets explore this feature.

This is for Office 365. Screenshots are from Windows 10 PC.

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Enable Converter in Word and PowerPoint

First, open a document in Microsoft Word or a presentation in PowerPoint. Next, click

File > Options

from the menu. Now, select Proofing on the left and click AutoCorrect Options on the right. Refer to below image:

Accessing AutoCorrect.Options

Next, select the Actions tab. Now, check the boxes for Enable Additional Actions in the right-click menu then Measurement Converter from the list. You will notice other actions you can enable. Just checkmark any additional ones you would like to use. See below image:

Enabling Measurement Converter option

Click OK, then OK once more to save and exit the options menu.

Enable Converter in Outlook

First, open Microsoft Outlook and click

File > Options

from your inbox or an email window.

Now, select Mail on the left and click Editor Options on the right. See following image:

Accessing Editor Options

On the next screen, choose Proofing on the left and AutoCorrect Options on the right. Refer to below image:

Accessing AutoCorrect Options

Next, select the Actions tab. Now, check the boxes for Enable Additional Actions in the right-click menu, and Measurement Converter in the list. Like with Word and PowerPoint you can checkmark the boxes for any other actions you would like to use. See below image:

Enabling Measurement Converter option

Next click OK on all screens to save and exit,

Use the Converter in Office

When you receive a document that includes unfamiliar measurements, such as those from a foreign country, this tool takes the work out of manual conversions. And if you are creating the document yourself, you can convert the measurement for your audience.

Just, select the text containing the measurement. You can do this by dragging your cursor through it.

Now, right-click and move your cursor down to Additional Actions in the menu. You will see the Measurement Converter in the pop-out window. Refer to below image:

Accessing Measurement Converter

This lets you view the conversion. Additionally, you can click to select a conversion from the list and it will replace the measurement in your document, presentation, or email. This is convenient when you are preparing an item for someone expecting a different unit of measurement.

Quote For the Day

The greatest mistake you can make in life is continually fearing that you’ll make one.

Elbert Hubbard

That’s it. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

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I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Remove All Images in a Word Document

If you need to quickly remove all the images and graphics from a Microsoft Word document, it’s easy to use a built-in option to delete them all at once.

If you need to quickly remove all the images and graphics from a Microsoft Word document, it’s easy to use a built-in option to delete them all at once. Let’s explore how this is done.

This is for devices running Microsoft Word

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The Technique

Microsoft Word includes a feature called Find and Replace to find items in your documents and replace them with something of your choice. Using this feature, you can find all the images in your document and replace them with nothing. This removes the images and leaves a blank space where they were located.

As a slight drawback, this technique will also remove all charts and graphs from your document.

The Removal Process

First, open your document with Microsoft Word. Next, in the menu at the top of the window, click Home. Now, click Replace in the Editing section of the toolbar. Refer to below image:

Image 1
Accessing the Replace button

Next, in the Find and Replace window, click the Find what box. In this box, type:

^g

(Alternately, you can click the More button, and then select Special and Graphic from the drop-down menu. Word will insert a ^g for you.)

In this case, ^g is a special code that means “graphic.” This “graphic” tag includes all images, charts, or graphs in your document. But no need to worry, you can undo this step later if you remove the images by mistake.

Now, click Replace All at the bottom of the window. See below image:

Image 2
Selecting Replace All to remove all images

All images in your document will be removed. A pop-up window will appear denoting the number of images removed. Click OK to close the window. See following image:

Image 3
Pop-up window denoting number of images replaced with a blank line

If you want to bring them back, press Ctrl+Z on Windows or Command+Z on Mac to undo the removal process. Or, you can insert images again if necessary. (You may need to edit your document to remove blank lines). Now, save your changes (if any) and exit Word.

Quote For the Day

The art of teaching is the art of assisting discovery.

Mark Van Doren

That was easy. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

Just click the Tweet icon below. This will launch Twitter where you click its icon to post the Tweet.

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I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Insert an Animated GIF Into Word

Adding an animated GIF GIF to your Word document is useful if you want to convey a message, demonstrate an activity, capture the audience’s attention, or just add some flair.

Adding an animated GIF to your Word document is useful if you want to convey a message, demonstrate an activity, capture the audience’s attention, or just add some flair. Let’s explore how this is done.

This is for devices running Windows 10 and Word. Screenshots are from Word in Office 365

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Microsoft Word lets you insert animated GIFs stored on your computer’s hard drive. The process for inserting a GIF in a Word document is no different than inserting a photo. Unfortunately, this only works in Microsoft Word for Windows 10. If you are a Mac user, you can still insert a GIF, but it will not be animated.

First, launch Word and place the cursor in the document’s location where you want the GIF to appear. Now, in the Illustrations group of the Insert tab, click Pictures. Next, choose This Device from the drop-down menu. Refer to below image:

GIF 1
Selecting where to find a GIF

Now, the File Explorer will open. Next, locate and select the GIF you want to insert, then click Insert. See below image:

GIF 3
Selecting a GiF to insert

The GiF will appear in your Word document. If you want to pause the Animation, click the pause icon in the bottom-left corner of the image. See following image:

GIF 6
Your GIF inserted into Word

To add alt text, right-click the GIF and then select Edit Alt Text from the context menu. Refer to below image:

GIF 4
Selecting the Edit Alt Text option

The Alt Text pane will appear to the right of the window. Type the desired alt text in the text box. See below image:

GIF 5
Entering your Alt Text

You have now learned how to insert an animated GIF into your Microsoft Word document. Congratulations!

Quote For the Day

If you are not sitting at the table, you are on the menu.

Jenny Boyer, MD, President of Tulsa County Medical Association

That’s it. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

Just click the Tweet icon below. This will launch Twitter where you click its icon to post the Tweet.

Check out TechSavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs, and Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Insert a YouTube Video Into Word

There might be times when it would be helpful to add a YouTube video to a Microsoft Word document. It can help you get your point across or help with training. Inserting the YouTube video directly into the document makes it easier to watch it. Word allows you to include the video right inside the document. Then the reader does not need to click a link to the video and launch a separate browser instance.

There might be times when it would be helpful to add a YouTube video to a Microsoft Word document. It can help you get your point across or help with training. Inserting the YouTube video directly into the document makes it easier to watch it. Word allows you to include the video right inside the document. Then the reader does not need to click a link to the video and launch a separate browser instance. Let’s explore how this is done.

This is for Word. Screenshots are from Word in Office 365 and Chrome using Windows 10

Copyright Scott Adams, Inc./Distributed by Universal Uclick for UFS

If you follow my example, I will be using a YouTube video from the 2008 Winner in a Poland ballroom dance competition on BBC One. I have been ballroom dancing for 15 years and this is one of the best ballroom dance videos I have found. As of this writing, the video has been viewed over 3.9 million times. I hope you enjoy the video and this post.

Copy YouTube Video URL

To insert a YouTube video into your Word document, open your browser of choice (I am using Chrome) and go to the YouTube website. Now, search for a YouTube video that you want to use by typing the name of the video in the search bar. Next, click the search button or simply press Enter. Refer to below image:

Entering your YouTube video name

Next, select the video from the search results by clicking it. See below image:

Accessing your YouTube video

Now, highlight the video’s URL in the browser’s address bar. Right-click and then select Copy from the context menu. (This is the easiest option). See following image:

YouTube 3
Copy the URL of your YouTube video

Copy YouTube Embed Code

Alternately, to get the embed code, click Share under the video. Refer to below image:

YouTube 4
Accessing your YouTube video Share option

Next, in the Share window, select Embed. See below image:

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Selecting your YouTube video Embed option

Now, the Embed Video window will appear. Click Copy to copy the code to your clipboard. Optionally, if you want to start the video from a specific time, check the box next to Start At and enter the desired time. See following image:

YouTube 6
Copy your YouTube video Embed code

Insert URL or Embed Code

With the URL or embed code copied to your clipboard, open Word. Next, place your pointer where you want to insert your video.

Now, from the top toolbar, click the Insert tab, then select Online Video in the Media group. Refer to below image:

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Selecting the Inset option for Online Video

The Insert a Video dialog box will appear. Next, paste (Ctrl+V or right-click > Paste) the URL or embed code in the text box, then click Insert. See below image where I used the URL:

YouTube 8
Copy/Paste the URL of your YouTube video

The video will now be inserted into the Word document. Clicking the play button will make the video pop out in the foreground while the background is dimmed. Press the Play button again to start. To pause, just click the video.

Your YouTube Video in Word

All of the normal video controls you would find on YouTube are also available for the video inserted into your Word document. See following image on how the video is displayed in Word:

YouTube 9
Your YouTube video inside of a Word document

Quote For the Day

Everybody gets so much information all day long that they lose their common sense.”

Gertrude Stein

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The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath
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