Is Windows 11 Upgrade For Now or Later

Based on reading other blog posts and websites, we recommend you wait to upgrade. Microsoft even seems to be reluctant about this upgrade. Why else would they offer a 10 day rollback to Windows 10? One thing it does is allow you to try out the upgrade.

Windows 11 Header

RAYMOND OGLESBY @RaymondOglesby2
October 12, 2021

Based on reading other blog posts and websites, we recommend you wait to upgrade. Microsoft even seems to be reluctant about this upgrade. Why else would they offer a 10 day rollback to Windows 10? One thing it does is allow you to try out the upgrade.

Windows 11 arrived on October 5, 2021. Unlike the big Windows 10 upgrade offer that felt impossible to avoid, Microsoft is recommending many PC owners not to upgrade.

This is for devices running Windows 10 and 11

Dilbert and Plan
Copyright Scott Adams, Inc./Distributed by Universal Uclick for UFS

How the Upgrade Will Work

Windows 11 will be a free upgrade for PCs running Windows 10, just as Windows 10 was a free upgrade for PCs running Windows 7 and Windows 8.

However, this time, Windows 11 is not designed for all those PCs. Windows 11 officially supports only very recent hardware. In addition to requiring TPM 2.0 and UFFI with Secure Boot, Windows 11 only supports certain recent CPUs.

Specifically, PCs with Intel processors must have an Intel 8th generation or newer processor. AMD PCs must be running at least AMD Zen 2. ARM PCs must have Qualcomm 7 or 8 Series hardware.

Microsoft refuses to explain exactly why only certain CPUs are supported.

Can your PC Run Windows 11

Not sure what hardware your PC has and whether it will support Windows 11? Microsoft offers an official PC Health Check app (yes the app is back) that will tell you whether your PC can officially run Windows 11. If not, the PC Health Check will tell you what the problem is. First, to check on your PC, download the PC Health Check app and scroll down to the bottom, then click on the download button. Refer to below image:

Upgrade 1
Download PC Health Check

Next, after the download, click on the .msi file to install. Once installed, click the big blue Check now button. See below image:

Upgrade 2
Run the PC Health Check

Now, the app will tell you whether your PC can officially run Windows 11. See following image:

Upgrade 3
A possible result in running the PC Health Check

However, the tool will not tell you the full story. Even if your PC can run Windows 11, you might not want to upgrade yet. And, even if your PC does not officially support Windows 11, you can upgrade anyway.

If Your PC Does Supports the Upgrade

Next, if Windows 11 officially supports your PC and you are not too worried about any missing options or potential bugs, feel free to upgrade. Refer to below image:

Upgrade 4
Your PC supports Windows 11

For example, Windows 11’s Taskbar is missing some features that were found in Windows 10’s. Windows 11’s Taskbar is glued to the bottom of your screen, and you can not drag and drop files and other items to Taskbar icons, as you could on Windows 10.

If Your PC Does Not Support the Upgrade

Now, if Windows 11 does not officially support your PC, you have a more difficult decision to make. Microsoft recommends against installing Windows 11 on computers that have older CPUs it does not officially support. We would also recommend against installing Windows 11 on these PCs.

Sure, it may work, but you may encounter bugs; and Microsoft says it will not guarantee security updates will be available in the future. After all, Windows 10 will be officially supported until late 2025.

So that’s our official recommendation: Do not do it, particularly if you use your PC for work or other critical tasks and you just need it to work. See below image where the processor is outdated:

Upgrade 6
Your PC does not support Windows 11

However, if you really want to get your hands on Windows 11 on a PC that is not officially supported, feel free to install the upgrade anyway. Just know what you are getting into. That’s why Microsoft makes you agree to a waiver full of legalese before you install Windows 11 on such a PC.

Try It For 10 Days

Next, if you are on the fence about Windows 11, you can give it a try. For the first 10 days after you upgrade, you will have the option to downgrade back to Windows 10.

It will be at;

Settings > System > Recovery > Go Back

under Recovery options. If the option is grayed out, it’s no longer available. See following image:

Upgrade 5
Revert back to Windows 10 within 10 days

After 10 days, the option to downgrade will silently vanish as Windows 11 will delete your old Windows 10 files from your system drive to free up space.

You can still downgrade a PC running Windows 11 back to Windows 10. However, you will have to perform a full reinstall of Windows 10, so you will have to reinstall all your applications and set everything up from scratch.

Quote For the Day

Design is a funny word. Some people think design means how it looks. But of course, if you dig deeper, it’s really how it works.

Steve Jobs

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I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app, and version you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong Vietnam: Events and Aftermath

Author: Raymond

I am Raymond Oglesby, an Information Technology (IT) specialist with 30 years in the field. I have taught Microsoft Applications and troubleshot computers in 15 countries and many States. My career was focused on mainframes and desktops from application development to implementation. I have written hundreds of programs for various architectures. I decided to start a blog to share my knowledge and experiences with you. I plan on updating this blog at least twice a week about smart phone apps to Windows. Please feel free to leave a Comment or Tweet. I would love to hear from you. Do you have a computer tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Please mention the app and version that you are using. To help me out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

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