How to Remove All Images in a Word Document

If you need to quickly remove all the images and graphics from a Microsoft Word document, it’s easy to use a built-in option to delete them all at once.

If you need to quickly remove all the images and graphics from a Microsoft Word document, it’s easy to use a built-in option to delete them all at once. Let’s explore how this is done.

This is for devices running Microsoft Word

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The Technique

Microsoft Word includes a feature called Find and Replace to find items in your documents and replace them with something of your choice. Using this feature, you can find all the images in your document and replace them with nothing. This removes the images and leaves a blank space where they were located.

As a slight drawback, this technique will also remove all charts and graphs from your document.

The Removal Process

First, open your document with Microsoft Word. Next, in the menu at the top of the window, click Home. Now, click Replace in the Editing section of the toolbar. Refer to below image:

Image 1
Accessing the Replace button

Next, in the Find and Replace window, click the Find what box. In this box, type:

^g

(Alternately, you can click the More button, and then select Special and Graphic from the drop-down menu. Word will insert a ^g for you.)

In this case, ^g is a special code that means “graphic.” This “graphic” tag includes all images, charts, or graphs in your document. But no need to worry, you can undo this step later if you remove the images by mistake.

Now, click Replace All at the bottom of the window. See below image:

Image 2
Selecting Replace All to remove all images

All images in your document will be removed. A pop-up window will appear denoting the number of images removed. Click OK to close the window. See following image:

Image 3
Pop-up window denoting number of images replaced with a blank line

If you want to bring them back, press Ctrl+Z on Windows or Command+Z on Mac to undo the removal process. Or, you can insert images again if necessary. (You may need to edit your document to remove blank lines). Now, save your changes (if any) and exit Word.

Quote For the Day

The art of teaching is the art of assisting discovery.

Mark Van Doren

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The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

What Are Windows 11 Minimum Requirements

Following are the basic requirements for installing Windows 11 on a PC. If your device does not meet these requirements, you may not be able to install Windows 11 and might want to consider purchasing a new device.


Following are the basic requirements for installing Windows 11 on a PC. If your device does not meet these requirements, you may not be able to install Windows 11 and might want to consider purchasing a new device. If you are unsure whether your PC meets these requirements, you can check with your PC Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) or, if your device is already running Windows 10, you can use the PC Health Check app to assess compatibility.

Note! As of this writing, the PC Health Check app has been removed from the App Store. The reason is because the app is denying millions of PCs for the upgrade. Microsoft has some hurdles to overcome. Let’s find out.

This is for Windows 10 devices

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The Requirements

Processor:

  • 1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster with 2 or more cores on a compatible 64 bit processor System on a Chip (SoC)

RAM:

  • 4 gigabyte (GB)

Storage:

  • 64 GB or larger storage device

System firmware:

  • UEFI, Secure Boot capable

TPM:

  • Trusted Platform Module (TPM) version 2.0

Graphics card:

  • Compatible with DirectX 12 or later with WDDM 2.0 driver

Display:

  • High definition (720p) display that is greater than 9” diagonally, 8 bits per color channel

Internet connection and Microsoft accounts: 

  • Windows 11 Home edition requires internet connectivity and a Microsoft account to complete device setup on first use. Switching a device out of Windows 11 Home in S mode also requires internet connectivity.

For all Windows 11 editions, internet access is required to perform updates and to download and take advantage of some features. A Microsoft account is required for some features.

Check Your Version of Trusted Platform Module (TPM)

To check this, we are going to use the Device Manager.

First, type “device manager” in the Cortana search box in lower left-hand corner. Next, in the search results, click on Device Manager in upper left-hand corner. Refer to below image:

Win 11 Requirements 1
Selecting Device Manager

Now, after the Device Manager opens, scroll down and click on Security Device to expand the menu and see if any TPM entries exist. See below image:

Win 11 Requirements 2
Opening Security devices for TPM entry

This computer meets the requirement for version 2.0 of TPM.

If you have TPM 1.2, you may be able to upgrade to Windows 11; there are no guarantees.

Quote For the Day

No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is, but the world as it will be.

Isaac Asimov

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I Would Like to Hear From You

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The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Use Safety Check in Google Chrome

Google Chrome offers a tool that lets you perform a checkup to secure your web browsing.

Google Chrome offers a tool that lets you perform a checkup to secure your web browsing. Let’s explore this feature.

This is for devices running Google Chrome. Screenshots are from Windows 10 PC

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First, launch the Chrome web browser on your Windows 10, Mac, Chrome OS, or Linux computer and click the three-dot (hamburger icon) located in the top-right corner. Refer to below image:

Selecting the hamburger icon

Next, click on Settings from the drop-down menu. See below image:

Selecting the Settings option

Now, scroll down to find the Safety Check section and click the Check Now option. See following image:

Selecting the Check Now option

Next, Chrome will kick off the Safety Check test. Depending on how much browsing data you have, this can take anywhere from a few seconds to a couple of minutes. When finished, just click the Review option by any listing. Refer to below image:

Selecting the Review button

In this process, Chrome scans a total of four core modules to look for any malicious code. It will make sure that the browser app is on the most recent version for protection against the latest internet viruses and that all of your installed third-party extensions are harmless. It will also check whether any of your saved passwords have been compromised in a data breach and that Safe Browsing, a setting that warns you against suspicious sites, is enabled.

Once the Safety Check is complete, Chrome will pull up shortcuts for anything that may need your immediate attention, such as reviewing compromised credentials.

After running Safety Check on my PC, it found comprised passwords. See below image where we are displaying three of them:

Viewing Comprised Passwords

After taking the recommended steps, you can also run the Safety Check again to ensure that your new security settings are active.

There’s another feature you can use by switching on Enhanced Safe Browsing, an advanced mode that allows Google to assess your browsing for potential threats and suggest privacy-focused improvements. However, we do not recommend using this option because you are choosing to share a copy of your browsing data with Google.

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I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Disable Snap to Maximize in Windows 10

You are using Windows 10, then suddenly; Snap. You have just dragged a window too close to the top edge of the screen, and now it’s maximized! If this automatic window snapping is not what you want, it’s easy to turn off.

You are using Windows 10, then suddenly; Snap. You have just dragged a window too close to the top edge of the screen, and now it’s maximized! If this automatic window snapping is not what you want, it’s easy to turn off.

This is for devices running Windows 10

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Why Windows Snap

The fact that certain windows will maximize when dragged too close to the edge of the screen is thanks to a Windows 10 feature called Snap Assist. It allows you to quickly make windows snap to fill available spaces on the screen without having to resize each one.

To visualize this, let’s say you have a Web browser, Word document, File Explorer, and the Windows 10 Settings app all open on your Windows 10 device. When you snap one of those applications, like Microsoft Word, to the left side of your screen, Windows 10 will show you a layout of your remaining open apps on the right side of the screen. Clicking any one of them will maximize that app and snap it to the right side of the screen.

But not everyone enjoys this feature, and there’s an easy way to turn it off.

How to Disable Snap

First, launch the Settings app by opening the Start menu and clicking the small gear icon in the left side of the Start menu. You can also press Windows+I to launch it. Refer to below image:

Snap 1
Accessing Settings app

Now, in Settings, click System. See below image:

Snap 2
Accessing System section

Next, in System settings, click Multitasking in the sidebar. Then, locate the Snap windows option and flip the toggle to turn it Off, See following image:

Snap 3
Turning Snap feature to Off; default is On

Now, close Settings. You can now position windows anywhere on the screen without them snapping into place.

Quote For the Day

Technology is supposed to make our lives easier, allowing us to do things more quickly and efficiently. But too often it seems to make things harder, leaving us with fifty-button remote controls, digital cameras with hundreds of mysterious features and book-length manuals, and cars with dashboard systems worthy of the space shuttle.

James Surowiecki

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I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Reset Windows 10 Settings App

On Windows 10, you can reset the Settings app when it does not want to open, keeps crashing, or when you are experiencing other problems.

On Windows 10, you can reset the Settings app when it does not want to open, keeps crashing, or when you are experiencing other problems.

If you are dealing with these problems, Windows 10 includes a way to reset the Settings app using the built-in secret option. Let’s explore how to reset the Settings app when it’s not working.

This is for devices running Windows 10

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Like with resetting any other app, when you reset the Settings app, it removes a variety of settings and brings them back to their default values. This can fix bugs and other problems that are caused by your custom settings.

To start resetting Settings, first, click your Start menu. Now, in the Cortana search box (next to the Start menu) type in “settings” (without the quotes). Next, in the search results, right-click the app and select App settings. Refer to below image:

Reset 1
sAccessing App settings

In the Settings window, scroll down to the Reset section and click Reset. See below image:

Reset 2
Accessing Reset section

You will get a prompt stating your app’s data will be deleted. Click Reset in the prompt to continue. See following image:

Reset 3
Selecting the Settings Reset option

The Settings app is now reset. Now, you can launch it as mentioned above or by pressing Windows+I.

If this does not fix your issue, you might want to reset your entire Windows 10 PC. (We recommend you only do this as a last resort). This brings all your settings to their default states, potentially fixing many issues on the computer.

The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool.

Richard P Feynman

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Check out TechSavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs, and Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Name Chrome Windows for Alt+Tab and Taskbar

If you keep many Google Chrome windows open to organize your tabs like me, you can go one step further and name each window. Chrome’s built-in naming feature makes it easy to remember the windows name in the Taskbar or the overview screen (Alt+Tab).

If you keep many Google Chrome windows open to organize your tabs like me, you can go one step further and name each window. Chrome’s built-in naming feature makes it easy to remember the windows name in the Taskbar or the overview screen (Alt+Tab).

The Windows naming feature was introduced in Chrome 90 and is available for Chrome on Windows 10, Mac, and Linux. It is easy to use and can save you from opening the wrong window.

This is for devices running Chrome 90. Screenshots are from Windows 10

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First, launch Chrome and open a Chrome window. Next, click the three-dot menu (the hamburger) icon in the top-right of the Chrome window. Refer to below image:

Name 1
Accessing the main menu

Now, from the drop-down menu, select More Tools. See below image:

Name 2
Selecting More Tools option

Next, from the expanded options, click Name Window. If you don’t see this, you are not running Chrome 90. To check your Chrome version, go to:

Click the three-dot menu (the hamburger) icon > Help > About Google Chrome

Now, your Google version will be displayed. Google should auto update to the latest version.

See following image for your expanded options:

Name 3
Accessing Name window option

A pop-up text box will appear. Now, enter the name for the window and click OK. Refer to below image:

Name 4
Naming your window

Alternatively, you can right-click the title bar of the Chrome window and select Name Window from the drop-down menu and go through the process of assigning it a name. See below image:

Name 5
Accessing Name window option from title bar

You will now see this name in the Alt+Tab on Windows 10. See following image:

Name 6
Your Alt+Tab named window

Additionally, this name will appear in the Taskbar on Windows 10. Refer to below image:

Name 7
Your Taskbar named window

Quote For the Day

The more you eliminate the inefficient use of information, the better it is for productivity.

Mitch Kapor

You are finished. This is probably a pretty niche feature, but for those of us who like to organize Chrome tabs by separating them out into windows, it’s a handy little trick.

Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

Just click the Tweet icon below. This will launch Twitter where you click its icon to post the Tweet.

Check out TechSavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs, and Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

Five Real Life Samples of Malware

Chances are good you will never seen malware up close and personal. Even if you threw caution to the winds and visited a dangerous site or clicked a treacherous link, your antivirus software probably wiped out any offending program before the latter could say boo. So, you might wonder, just what does malware look like? Would I even recognize a malware program if I saw it?

Courtesy of PC Mag

Chances are good you will never seen malware up close and personal. Even if you threw caution to the winds and visited a dangerous site or clicked a treacherous link, your antivirus software probably wiped out any offending program before the latter could say boo. So, you might wonder, just what does malware look like? Would I even recognize a malware program if I saw it?

To be fair, a lot of malicious programs do not look like anything at all. A virus, for example, tries its best to hide from view while infecting other files and computers. A bot sits quietly on your computer until it gets orders from the command and control center to spew some spam or participate in a DDoS attack on a major website. Trojans, by contrast, appear to be useful, legitimate programs, putting up a pretty façade to hide background activities like stealing your personal data. And when ransomware hollers for your attention, it’s bad news.

This is for all devices

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The Horror of Ransomware

If a ransomware attack hits your computer, you will not know it at first. The ransomware stays out of sight, quietly encrypting your important files. Once the dirty work is done, the malware totally demands your attention with its ransom note. The perpetrators promise that if you pay the specified ransom (usually in Bitcoin or some other cryptocurrency) you will get your files back, but if they take your money and run, you do not have any recourse. You really do not want a direct encounter with ransomware.

Malware Bundled

Sometimes the problem with an installation is notthe program itself, but the software that’s bundled with it. You may find completely legitimate software—even antivirus programs; bundled with adware, spyware, or other unwanted trash. In a case like that, the security vendor is not to blame. A third party created the deceptive bundle. AppEsteem is a young company with a mission to expose these deceptors and to warn legitimate companies when they stray too far toward the dark side of bundling.

The installer shown here offers a free player for FLV video files. Along with the player you are privileged to receive a shady Adware program masquerading as a coupon browser. There’s a checkbox that says you agree to its terms; uncheck the box and you can not proceed. No video player for you! The best thing that can happen with this kind of bundling is that you’re forced to install a program you did not want. Mostly it’s worse than that, because the bundled bonus is malware. Refer to below image:

Malware 2
Bundled Malware

Now here’s something handy; a multi-utility install program. If you read Russian, you know it’s “the fastest and most convenient way to install programs.” Just check the boxes for the ones you want and turn the installer loose. The list includes browsers, messenger programs, video players, even antivirus utilities. But when you install them, you also get a dose of malware. See below image:

Malware 3
Utility Pack Malware

Trojan Horses

Here, we have a sharp-looking utility designed, apparently, to ensure that your PC does not limp along with old, outdated drivers. However, if you try to update any drivers, or back up your existing drivers, you must pay. This is a model used both by some legitimate programs and by rogue antivirus scareware utilities. Lucky you, though: there’s a promotional price that ends today. Its overt activities are just a wee bit suspicious. See following image:

Malware 4
Driver Malware

Want to get into smartphone repair? This set of tools and manuals looks like it might be a big help. Alas, you ca not see just what you’re getting until you pay for your registration. While you are perusing schematics, it collects personal information behind the scenes and takes orders for further unwanted activity from a remote command and control server. Refer to below image:

Malware 5
Smartphone Malware

You probably do not know this, but the EXE files that represent programs on your Windows computer are also called PE files, short for Portable Executable. Every PE file starts with an extensive header that contains a ton of information telling Windows about the program. Malware researchers learn a lot by digging into that header. See below image:

Malware 6
Portable Executable Malware

Lets Hope You Don’t See These

As you can see, malicious programs, like legitimate programs, run the gamut from sad-looking attempts to totally professional ones. With any luck, and with powerful, up-to-date antivirus protection, these images are the only malware you will ever see. Malware is just one of many threats to your devices and private information.

The best utility for finding Malware on your device is Malwarebytes, download here.

Email/Phone Scams

A few reminders to keep the bad guys away in your emails and phone calls:

  • Do not click that link. Instead hover your mouse over each element of the email and look for anything suspicious. If suspicious, do not click that link – per my son, VP at True Digital Security.
  • Do not open emails from FedX, USPS, Wells Fargo, Walmart, Cox Communications, Thank You, SSA, or VA if you have no dealings with them. They will contact you by mail not by phone.
  • Do not give out personal informati0n over the phone. If you need to contact someone, you initiate the call.
  • Never buy gift cards or give out their serial number.
  • If your Userid or Password has been leaked in a data breech, change them as soon as possible.

Quote For the Day

I don’t pretend we have all the answers. But the questions are certainly worth thinking about.

Arthur C Clarke

That’s it. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

Just click the Tweet icon below. This will launch Twitter where you click its icon to post the Tweet.

Check out TechSavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs, and Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Access Two-Factor Authentication for Major Apps

Two-Factor authentication (2FA) adds an extra security layer to your accounts across the internet. 2FA means your accounts require information beyond user name and password to confirm you are who you say you are before you can get into the accounts. Let’s explore how to access 2FA.

Two-Factor authentication (2FA) adds an extra security layer to your accounts across the internet. 2FA means your accounts require information beyond user name and password to confirm you are who you say you are before you can get into the accounts. Let’s explore how to access 2FA.

This is for iPhone, iPad, PCs and Macs. Screenshots are from Windows 10 and iPhone XR

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The “second factor” comes in after you enter your username and password, which are considered to be the “first factor.” 2FA can be used to confirm your identity by asking for an extra piece of information. The additional information can be:

  • Something you know, like an additional passcode.
  • Something you have, like your phone to receive a one time authorization code.
  • Something you are, like a fingerprint or voice print. This is also called biometric security.

The idea is to provide another piece of information a hacker would not have, making it harder for the bad guy to break into your account.

The following is not an exhaustive list of services with 2FA ability, but we cover the major services everyone tends to use, and walk you through how to access. We will cover Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, Instagram, LinkedIn, Microsoft, and Twitter. Activate 2FA on all of these and you will be more secure. Once you have found their 2FA screens you can can set it up for each app.

Amazon

First, launch Amazon.com on the desktop and login in to your account. Next, click the Menu icon in upper left-hand corner. Now, scroll down the drop-down menu to Your Account option.

Next, click on the Login & Security big button. Now, on the next page, click Edit next to Two-Step Verification (2SV) Settings. The preferred method is an authentication app (scan the QR code); phone number(s) are the backup method. Refer to below image where I already have 2SV based on my phone number (which is dimmed out):

2FA 1
Amazon 2SV

If you think your account has been comprised, go back to Login & Security and click the Edit button next to Secure Your Account.

Apple

Following are the steps on how to access 2FA for Apple using either iOS or macOS.

On iOS go to:

Settings > [your name at the top] > Password & Security > Turn on Two-Factor Authentication.

On macOS go to:

System Preferences > iCloud, then sign in, click Account Details > Security > Turn on Two-Factor Authentication.

Note! once Apple 2FA is activated for two weeks, you can not turn it off. “Certain features in the latest versions of iOS and macOS require this extra level of security, which is designed to protect your information,” according to Apple. See below image for iOS:

2FA 2
Apple 2FA

Facebook

First, login to Facebook on your desktop. Next, click the Down arrow in upper right-hand corner. Now, from the drop-down menu that appears, click on the Settings & Privacy option. On the next screen, click the Privacy & Checkup option. From there, click on the topic How to keep your account secure. Under this topic, you can access 2FA for Facebook. See following image where 2FA is On with a backup method of sending a text message to a phone number.

2FA 3
Facebook 2FA

Related

How to Perform a Privacy Checkup on Facebook

Google

First, sign in to your Google account on your smart device. Next, at the top of the screen, locate the Security tab and tap it. Now, scroll down and tap the 2- Step Verification option. You can continuing scrolling to see more ways to verify you. Refer to below image where my 2SV is already turned On and I am using the backup method of Voice or text message:

2FA 4
Google 2SV

Google calls its system 2SV . It’s all about identifying you via phone. When you enter a password to access your Google account for almost any service, if 2SV is on, there are multiple options to get that second step. First among them now: the Google Prompt. You simply add your smartphone to your account, make sure the Google search app is on the phone, and at login, you can go to the phone and simply acknowledge with a tap that you are the one signing in.

Instagram

First, launch Instagram on your smart device. Next, go to your Profile in lower right-hand corner, then tap the menu (the hamburger icon) on the top-right. Tap Settings > Security > Two-Factor Authentication. There you can choose how you would like to get your authentication code by tapping the Get Started button. See below image:

2FA 5
Instagram 2FA

Linkedin

Business social network Linkedin makes it easy to set up verification, either by SMS texts or authentication app.

First, launch Linkedin on you smart device, then go to your Profile at upper left-hand screen. Next, go to Settings > Sign in & Security > Account > Two-step verification to activate it or deactivate. See following image:

2FA 6
Linkedin 2SV

Microsoft

First sign into your Microsoft account on your smart device. Now, tap your Profile. Next, scroll down and tap Security. 2FA is the second option, tap on it. Once again, tap Two -step verification > Manage. Microsoft will suggest you get app passwords as needed for older service or devices (like Xbox 360); go in later to generate one as needed. Refer to below image:

2FA 7
Microsoft 2SV

Twitter

First, to activate Login Verification on Twitter.com on the desktop, login to Twitter, Click the More menu on the left (the three dots) and select Security & Account Access > Security > Two-Factor Authentication. See following image:

2FA 8
Twitter 2FA

Quote For the Day

Technology is a useful servant but a dangerous master.

Christian Louis Lange

That’s it. With 2FA activated on these apps you are more secure. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

Just click the Tweet icon below. This will launch Twitter where you click its icon to post the Tweet.

Check out TechSavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs, and Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Just send an email to contact@techsavvy.life. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Insert an Animated GIF Into Word

Adding an animated GIF GIF to your Word document is useful if you want to convey a message, demonstrate an activity, capture the audience’s attention, or just add some flair.

Adding an animated GIF to your Word document is useful if you want to convey a message, demonstrate an activity, capture the audience’s attention, or just add some flair. Let’s explore how this is done.

This is for devices running Windows 10 and Word. Screenshots are from Word in Office 365

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Microsoft Word lets you insert animated GIFs stored on your computer’s hard drive. The process for inserting a GIF in a Word document is no different than inserting a photo. Unfortunately, this only works in Microsoft Word for Windows 10. If you are a Mac user, you can still insert a GIF, but it will not be animated.

First, launch Word and place the cursor in the document’s location where you want the GIF to appear. Now, in the Illustrations group of the Insert tab, click Pictures. Next, choose This Device from the drop-down menu. Refer to below image:

GIF 1
Selecting where to find a GIF

Now, the File Explorer will open. Next, locate and select the GIF you want to insert, then click Insert. See below image:

GIF 3
Selecting a GiF to insert

The GiF will appear in your Word document. If you want to pause the Animation, click the pause icon in the bottom-left corner of the image. See following image:

GIF 6
Your GIF inserted into Word

To add alt text, right-click the GIF and then select Edit Alt Text from the context menu. Refer to below image:

GIF 4
Selecting the Edit Alt Text option

The Alt Text pane will appear to the right of the window. Type the desired alt text in the text box. See below image:

GIF 5
Entering your Alt Text

You have now learned how to insert an animated GIF into your Microsoft Word document. Congratulations!

Quote For the Day

If you are not sitting at the table, you are on the menu.

Jenny Boyer, MD, President of Tulsa County Medical Association

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Check out TechSavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs, and Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

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The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

How to Use Spell Check Everywhere on Chrome

We have all been there; looking up a word on Google just to find out how it’s spelled. No matter the typos, Google usually knows what you want to type. Thankfully, Google allows you to use its spell-check feature everywhere in your Chrome web browser.

We have all been there; looking up a word on Google just to find out how it’s spelled. No matter the typos, Google usually knows what you want to type. Thankfully, Google allows you to use its spell-check feature everywhere in your Chrome web browser.

Called the Enhanced spell check, this setting allows you to access Google’s more advanced spell check whenever you type something on the Internet.

But as is the case with most Google services, there is a privacy cost to this. Turning on Enhanced spell check in Chrome also means agreeing to send everything you type on the web to Google’s server. So enable it at your own risk. But, you can also enable Basic spell check without sending data to Google. Lets explore how to do this.

This is for PCs, Macs, Chrome OS, or Linux running Chrome

Dilbert and Package
dCopyright Scott Adams, Inc./Distributed by Universal Uclick for UFS

First, open your Google Chrome browser. Next, click the three-dot hamburger icon located in the top right-hand corner. Refer to below image:

Spell Check 1
Accessing the menu hamburger icon

Now, from the drop-down menu that appears, select Settings. See below image:

Spell Check 2
Accessing Settings

Alternatively, you can press the Cmd+Comma keyboard shortcut on a Mac or Alt+E on a Windows PC to access the Settings option.

Next, in the sidebar, click Advanced to reveal the advanced menu. Now, choose Languages from the list. See following image:

Spell Check 3
Accessing Languages under the Advanced section

Under the Spell check section, toggle the radio button in front of the Basic spell check option to turn it On. If you want enhanced spell checking, toggle the radio button in front of the Enhanced spell check to turn it On. Keep in mind, the enhanced option means you are sending your browser activity to Google. Refer to below image:

Spell Check 4
Enabling Basic spell check option

At the time of writing, Enhanced spell check is not available for Google Chrome’s Android and iPhone clients.

In case you are still not satisfied with your Chrome’s spell check, you can give a third party Chrome extension called Grammarly, a try.

Quote for the Day

The number one benefit of information technology is that it empowers people to do what they want to do. It lets people be creative. It lets people be productive. It lets people learn things they didn’t think they could learn before, and so in a sense it is all about potential.

Steve Ballmer, Microsoft

That’s it. Please feel free to share this post! One way to share is via Twitter.

Just click the Tweet icon below. This will launch Twitter where you click its icon to post the Tweet.

Check out TechSavvy.Life for blog posts on smartphones, PCs, and Macs! You may email us at contact@techsavvy.life for comments or questions.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath