Microsoft File Recovery Tool for Windows 10

Victims of accidental erasures have long relied on either old shareware programs or more comprehensive professional tools like Recuva, EaseUS Data Recovery, Disk Drill Data Recovery, Wise Data Recovery, among others, to recover deleted data.

Windows 10 Header

Victims of accidental erasures have long relied on either old shareware programs or more comprehensive professional tools like Recuva, EaseUS Data Recovery, Disk Drill Data Recovery, Wise Data Recovery, among others, to recover deleted data.

This is for Windows 10 operating system

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Curiously, Windows never offered users its own version of an undelete utility. Until now. Why now? Who knows.

Microsoft is offering its new Windows 10 File Recovery Tool for free, online from the Microsoft App Store here.

Note! Make sure you sign in to your Microsoft Account FIRST before downloading.

Refer to below image:

Windows File Recovery app

It’s a command-line only tool, which means it doesn’t sport the attractive interface like most popular undelete utilities.

But it relies on the same principle more sophisticated shareware and professional undelete utilities have long used; deleted files are not actually immediately erased. Instead, the computer merely removes pointers to the locations of the “erased” data, notifying the system that the containers holding those data are available for use should they be needed to store newer files.

The new Windows File Recovery Tool offers three modes of recovery. The default setting is used mainly for NTFS file systems and is ideal for resurrecting recently deleted files.

A more aggressive Segment mode may do a better job retrieving older deleted files, though it will likely take longer.

The third mode, Signature. is the preferred option for retrieving files stored on external devices using FAT, exFAT and ReFS file systems.

The File Recovery Tool has only limited usefulness on solid state drives (SSDs). That is because those drives, unlike traditional hard disk drives, immediately wipe out deleted files.

Although it is not listed as such, the new tool appears to be a beta offering given its low version number or build. Users must have the Windows 10 update (May 2020) or later..

As always, users who need to retrieve an accidentally deleted file should act quickly. File segments remaining on a hard drive with address pointers removed will be overridden as new files are continually created. For the same reason, it is best to have the Windows File Recovery Tool already loaded before an emergency arises. Installing the program after a file is accidentally deleted increases the odds that deleted file fragments will be overridden by the new program.

I have found TechSavvy.Life blog posts extremely helpful. Check them out for posts on smart phone apps, Macs and PCs!

I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

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Author: Raymond

I am Raymond Oglesby, an Information Technology (IT) specialist with 30 years in the field. I have taught Microsoft Applications and troubleshot computers in 15 countries and many States. My career was focused on mainframes and desktops from application development to implementation. I have written hundreds of programs for various architectures. I decided to start a blog to share my knowledge and experiences with you. I plan on updating this blog at least twice a week about smart phone apps to Windows. Please feel free to leave a Comment or Tweet. I would love to hear from you. Do you have a computer tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Please mention the app and version that you are using. To help me out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

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