How to Insert a File into Another Word Document

When creating or modifying a Microsoft Word document, it can be beneficial to insert or embed another file into it. By inserting a file into a Word document, that file becomes a part of the Word document. A reader can open and view the embedded file without requiring special permission or access.

When creating or modifying a Microsoft Word document, it can be beneficial to insert or embed another file into it. By inserting a file into a Word document, that file becomes a part of the Word document. A reader can open and view the embedded file without requiring special permission or access.

Nearly any file can be inserted into a Word document, However, be aware that inserting a file into a Word document can increase its size significantly.

In this post, instead of using “copy and paste” from one document into another, we will show you another way, using the Insert feature.

This is for devices running Word

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First, open the Word document that you would like to add the contents of, another Word document to.

Next, in the Text group of the Insert tab, click the drop-down arrow next to the Object option. Refer to below image:

Copy 1
Accessing the Object option

A drop-down menu will appear. There are two options to choose from here; Object and Text From File.

  • Object: Embeds an object such as a Word document or Excel chart
  • Text From File: Inserts the text from another file into your Word document

The Text From File option is essentially a quicker way to “copy and paste” the content of another file into this one.

Now, click the Text From File option in the drop-down menu. See below image:

Copy 2
Accessing the Text from file option from drop-down menu

Next, the File Explorer (Finder on Mac) will open. Find the file you would like to copy the text from, select it, then click Insert. See following image:

Copy 3
Selecting the file to be inserted into original Word document

The contents of that Word document will now appear in the current Word document. This works well if there is not a lot of content in the other Word document, but if there is, embedding it may be a better option.

You may want to add headings/subheadings to the inserted document.

If your original Word document has a Table of Contents, make sure you update your table. First, under the References tab, select the Update Table option. Refer to below image:

Copy 4
Accessing Update Table option

Now, from the pop-up window that will be displayed, select an option. It is recommended you choose the Update entire table option, then cli ck OK. See below image:

Copy 5
Selecting how you want the Table of Contents to be updated

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How to Insert an Outlook Contact Into Word

There are a number of ways to insert contact information into a Word document, like using Mail Merge. But what if you just wanted to insert specific Outlook contacts. The easiest way is by adding an Address Book button to the Quick Address Toolbar (QAT) so that you can add contacts on-the-fly and at the touch of a button in any Microsoft Office application.

There are a number of ways to insert contact information into a Word document, like using Mail Merge. But what if you just wanted to insert specific Outlook contacts. The easiest way is by adding an Address Book button to the Quick Address Toolbar (QAT) so that you can add contacts on-the-fly and at the touch of a button in any Microsoft Office application. Lets explore how to insert an Outlook contact into Microsoft Word.

This is for devices running Microsoft Word

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Adding the QAT Address Book Button

(If you have already done this, you may skip this step). To add the button, click the arrow icon in the QAT. This icon opens a drop-down menu that allows you to customize the QAT. Refer to below image:

Contacts 1
Accessing the Quick Access Toolbar

Now, from the available options, choose More Commands. See below image:

Contacts 2
Choosing More Commands

Next, click the Quick Access Toolbar from the left sidebar. Now, choose Commands Not in the Ribbon from the Choose Commands From drop-down menu. See following image:

Contacts 3
Accessing commands not on the ribbon

Now, choose Address Book. Next, click the Add button to add it to the QAT. Refer to below image:

Contacts 4
Adding the Address Book button to the ribbon

Finally, click OK to add the Address Book button. See below image:

Contacts 5
Saving your change for the ribbon

Inserting Contacts Into a Word Document

To insert a contact, position the cursor where you would like to add the contact information. Next, from the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Address Book icon you just added. See following image:

Contacts 6
Selecting the Address Book button to insert a contact

Now, contact names from your address book should appear. If you have multiple address books, select one from the drop-down box to view its contacts. Click the contact you would like to add, then click the OK button. Refer to below image:

Contacts 7
Inserting an Address Book contact into Word

Now, any information that you have for the contact should appear in the document. This, however, is almost entirely up to how thorough you are in creating the contact. For some, it will be just a name and an email address. For others, you will get the full details that includes address, phone number, and the like. It all depends on what you added when you created a new contact (or edited it later).

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How to Use Emoji in Microsoft Word

One of the most common forms of shorthand communication developed for the mobile age is the icon-based vocabulary known as Emoji. You have seen those seen Emoji pictures on social media. It’s available for Microsoft Word in Windows 10, MacOS, iOS, iPadOS, and Android.

One of the most common forms of shorthand communication developed for the mobile age is the icon-based vocabulary known as Emoji. You have seen those seen Emoji pictures on social media. It’s available for Microsoft Word in Windows 10, MacOS, iOS, iPadOS, and Android.

Microsoft Word is an indisputable application in the documentation world. When preparing documentations, you can easily insert Emoji to jazz up a Word document on various devices.

You can enter an Emoji in Word in the same way you can enter an Emoji in any other application. While typing in a Word document, just use the appropriate keyboard shortcut for your operating system. Let!s explore how this is done.

This is for devices supporting Microsoft Word. Screenshots are from Windows 10

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Open Rmoji Keyboard

Open your Word document and position the cursor where you want to insert the Emoji.

  • For Windows 10 – Press, “Windows + Period” keys or “Windows + Semicolon” keys to open the Emoji picker.
  • For MaOS – Press “Command + Control + Space” keys to open Emoji keyboard on a Mac, which is a Character Viewer app in MacOS.
  • For iPhone, iPad, or Android phone, you can use the standard Emoji keyboard.

These keyboard shortcuts work in basically all Windows or Mac applications.

A pop-up will be displayed with all popular emoji symbols. The most frequently used Emoji will appear first. Refer to below image:

Emoji 1
The Emoji keyboard

Searching for an Emoji

On both Windows and Mac, you can start typing the name of an Emoji to search for it. For example, to find “music” related Emoji, just start typing a few characters of the keyword. You can also just scroll through the long list of Emoji to find one.

Use the arrow keys and press Enter or click an Emoji to insert it. See below image:

Emoji 2
Searching for a music Emoji

The Emoji you insert into your document will appear as a colorful icon. You can resize them. adjust their font size, just as you would with any other text in the document.

See following image for an inserted “music”Emoji followed by text:

Emojii 3
Inserting an Emoji followed by some text

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How to Insert a PDF into Word

One unique feature of Microsoft Word is the ability to insert a PDF file directly into Word, and it can be done in only a few steps. You can insert it as an embedded object, a linked object, or text only.

One unique feature of Microsoft Word is the ability to insert a PDF file directly into Word, and it can be done in only a few steps. You can insert it as an embedded object, a linked object, or text only. Let’s explore how to do this.

This is for devices supporting Microsoft Word

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Embedding Explained

When you embed a PDF file in Word, the first page of your PDF appears in the document. Since an embedded object becomes part of the document after it is inserted, it’s no longer connected to the source file. Any changes made to the original PDF in the future will not be reflected in the Word document.

Linking Explained

Inserting a PDF file as a linked object means it appears as the first page of the PDF, but it is also linked to the original file. Changes made to the PDF will also be reflected in the Word document. You can opt to display an icon instead of a preview. Either option will open the PDF file when selected.

Text Only Explained

Inserting a PDF as text involves the use of copy and paste. Copying the text from the PDF file and pasting it into a document is a straightforward way to insert a bit of text into Word.

Embed or Link a PDF

First, open a Word document, and place your cursor where you would like to insert the PDF file. Next, select the Insert tab. Refer to below image:

Insert PDF 1
Selecting the Insert tab

Now, click Object from the Text group. See below image:

Insert PDF 2
Selecting the Object option

From the small drop-down menu, select Object. See following image:

Insert PDF 3
Selecting the Object option from drop-down menu

From the Object window, click the Create from File tab. Next, select Browse. Refer to below image:

Insert PDF 4
From the Create from file tab, selecting the Browse option

Navigate to the location of the PDF, select it, and then click Insert. See below image:

Insert PDF 5
Selecting your PDF file to Insert into Word

Selecting Your Options

Now, it is time to decide if you want to (1) link directly to the source file, and/or (2) display the PDF as an icon. Link directly to the source file if you want to have the inserted file reflect any new changes made to the source file. To do so, just checkmark the Link to file option. You are linking to the PDF in your document.

While here, checkmark Display as icon if you don’t want to take up too much space on the page. If you do not enable any of these options, the PDF will be displayed in its entirety on the Word document and will not reflect any new changes made to the source file. You are embedding the PDF into your document.

To finish, select OK. Refer to below image:

Insert PDF 6
Selecting ink your PDF file and display an icon

The PDF will now be inserted in the Word document. See below image:

Insert PDF 7
Your linked PDF file displayed as an icon in Word

Copy and Paste

Copy

First, open your PDF file. Now, highlight some text you want to copy. Next, right-click your selection and select Copy.

Paste

Second, open your Word document. Now, place the cursor where you want to paste the text from the PDF file. Next, right-click and select a Paste option with or without formatting.

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How to Set the Oxford Comma in Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word can warn you about the Oxford or “serial comma”, whether you prefer to use the extra comma or not. It is a feature in the latest Word 365 and Word 2019 and goes back to Word 2002. By default, the option is off.

Microsoft Word can warn you about the Oxford or “serial comma”, whether you prefer to use the extra comma or not. It is a feature in the latest Word 365 and Word 2019 and goes back to Word 2002. By default, the option is off.

The Oxford comma is one of those grammatical things that most people do not worry about. It is a question of whether to add a comma at the end of a list, for example:

Raymond is teaching on Word, Excel, Access and Outlook.

Or using the Oxford comma:

Raymond is teaching on Word, Excel, Access, and Outlook.

It is okay to ingnore the Oxford comma for personal documents, emails, tweets and your personal Facebook page. However for business purposes, especially legal documents, you should use the Oxford comma. Avoiding the use of the Oxford comma has resulted in various lawsuits forcing companies to pay employees millions; what was implied without the comma failed in the courts. Moral of the lawsuits; use the Oxford comma for clarity and to avoid lawsuits.

In our example, using the Oxford comma says Raymond is teaching each class separately. Without the comma denotes that Raymond is teaching Access and Outlook as a combined class.

The setting for the Oxford comma has changed in the various Word versions.

This is for Word 365, Word 2019, and Word 2016 for PCs and Macs

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Finding the Oxford Comma

Open a Word document. Next, click the File menu option. Now, navigate to

Options > Proofing > Writing Style > Settings

Now, scroll down the long list till you see the Oxford Comma checkbox in the Punctuation Conventions section. Refer to below image:

Oxford Comma 1
The Oxford Comma option

Setting the Oxford Comma

Checking the box will enforce the comma in lists. A missing Oxford comma will show a red dashed line with the suggestion “A comma before “and” or “or” could make this clearer.” See below image:

Oxford Comma 2
The Oxford Comma suggestion

Grammar checking in English is hard but the software does a remarkable job. This being said, the feature is not perfect and is no substitute for proof reading.

While discussing grammer, there is another similar situation. I see a lot of blog posts using words like “It’s” or Doesn”t”. The correct usage is to avoid using the apostrophe. In my examples, you would spell out the words to say “It is” and “Does not” for clarity.

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How to Hear a Document with Speak in Word

Microsoft Word for Windows has a “text to speech” or Speak feature to read back a document. It’s hiding away behind the Ribbon but works fine once you’ve found it. We are going to add the icon to the Quick Access Toolbar (QAT) for easy accessiblity.

Microsoft Word for Windows has a “text to speech” or Speak feature to read back a document.  It’s hiding away behind the Ribbon but works fine once you’ve found it. We are going to add the icon to the Quick Access Toolbar (QAT) for easy accessiblity. Lets explore how to do this.

This is for Microsoft Word 2010 through latest version

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Speak button can be put on the Quick Access Toolbar (QAT) or Ribbon. Refer to below image for the Speak icon on QAT:

Windows Speak 1
The Speak icon on Quick Access Toolbar

While in Word, select some text or Ctrl + A for the whole document, then click the Speak icon. If there’s no selection, clicking Speak will say the current word at the cursor.

Add the Speak Icon

You’ll find Speak on the Commands not on the Ribbon list.  The easiest choice is adding it to the Quick Access Toolbar. Just click on the Down Arrow in the Menu Bar and select More Commands. See below image:

Windows Speak 2
More Commands option

The Quick Access Toolbar will be displayed. Select Commands Not in the Ribbon from the drop down box and locate the Speak command. Next, click the Add button to add the command to the Quick Access Toolbar. Click OK when finished. Refer to below image:

Adding the Speak option to the Quick Access Toolbar

Now it’s on the Quick Access Toolbar. Just select some text and click the Speak icon.

Change the Voice

To access the controls for Speak or Read Aloud:

  1. Access the Control Panel via the Cortana search bar. Just enter Control Panel, then click the button in upper left hand corner.
  2. Click Speech Recognition
  3. Click Text to Speech

Word Speak is making use of a little-appreciated Text to Speech part of Windows.  See following image:

Windows Speak 4
Text to Speech dialog

That means the Speech options available depend somewhat on the version of Windows, not Office. Some of the options are:

Voice Selection – the English language options are “David” or “Zira” – male or female.

Preview Voice – click to hear the current voice.

Voice speed – faster or slower than the Normal setting.

To start the Speech at Windows startup, click the Speech Recognition tab and checkmark Run Speech Recognition at startup. When finished, click OK. See below image:

Windows Speak 5
Selecting Text to Speech at Windows startup

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How to Add Captions in Word

Word’s Caption feature allows you to insert captions after figures, tables or equations in your document. You can choose to have Word insert them automatically or do it yourself manually. Lets learn how to add and edit captions to set apart elements in your document.

You are not limited to figures, tables or equations; you can create a new label like Picture or Photo. If you are using Chapters in your document, you can add the Chapter number to your caption. Almost any object or inserted item in Word can be captioned.

This is for PCs, Macs and similar platforms that support Microsoft Word

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Add a Caption

There are two ways to add a caption:

  1. Select the figure/table/equation, right click and select Insert Caption. (Note! This method works only for figures and tables, not equations.)
  2. Select the figure/table/equation, go to the References tab on the ribbon and select Insert Caption. See below image:
Word Caption 1

If you don’t select the object and choose References > Insert Caption the caption will be inserted where the cursor is placed.

Your Caption Options

The Caption dialog box will now open, with a number of options for you to set. Refer to below image;

Word Caption 2

Below are the options to chose from:

Captions – type in the label you want

Label – or more correctly caption prefix.  Choose table, equation or figure. This will automatically add that label to the caption.

New Label – If you want your captions to have a label other than the ones provided, you can add a new one from the New Label option. (For example, Word provides the options Equation, Figure and Table, but if you are including photos in your document, you may prefer to label them Picture or Photo.)

Exclude Label from Captions – check this box and no label/prefix will be included. The caption will just contain the number and the text that you enter.

Position – caption to appear above or below the object. Only works if the object is selected before Insert Caption. Otherwise this field will be disabled and the caption placed where you have set your cursor.

AutoCaption certain types of objects can be automatically captioned when they are included in a document.

The caption will now appear in the specified location, with its number automatically allocated. See following image:

Word Capture 3
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Numbering Options for Your Captions

If you want to change the format of the numbering system on your captions, do this by clicking the Numbering button in the Caption dialog box. Refer to below image:

Word Capture 4

The Caption Numbering dialog box will open. See below image:

Word Capture 5

Format: Choose the numbering format you want to use:

  • Numerals (1, 2, 3, 4…)
  • Lowercase letters (a, b, c, d…)
  • Uppercase letters (A, B, C, D…)
  • Lowercase Roman numerals (i, ii, iii, iv…)
  • Uppercase Roman numerals (I, II, III, IV…)
  • And others depending on the installed language packs.

Include Chapter Number: If your document contains chapters, you can choose to have the numbering restart for each chapter and have the chapter number included in the caption numbering system.

First select the Caption in your Word document. Then you need to link the Style (e.g. Heading 1) with a multi-level list at Home > Paragraph > Multi-Level List > Define Multi-Level List > More. This adds automatic numbering to each style so the captions have a number to show. See following image;

Word Capture 6

Chapter Starts with Style: Select what level of heading you would like to signify a new chapter.

Use Separator:  Choose the separator that you would like to use between the chapter number and the caption number (hyphen, period, colon or em-dash).

Change Your Caption Settings

Changing the caption settings isn’t obvious because right-clicking doesn’t show an option to open the Caption dialog.

The trick is to select the whole caption then References > Captions > Insert Caption. Refer to below image:

Word Caption 7

This opens the Caption dialog with the current settings.

Updating Your Caption Numbering

At the core of captions are field codes. Updating the caption numbering is the same as any other field code updates.

Select the whole document with Ctrl+A then update fields with F9 (or right-click to choose Update Field).

Change Your Caption Text

The text after the caption label can be edited in the document. Just click in the caption text and type as usual. See following image;

Word Caption 8

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How to Use Word AutoText Feature

Creating and using custom AutoText entries for frequently used phrases is a great way to speed up your content creation in Microsoft Word. By default, Word has very few entries so you may want to add your own. The good news is you can set up these time-savers in just a few clicks!

The software does come with lots of AutoText Document fields, like Author, Company Info, Status and other built-in entries such as Headers, Footers, Tables, Watermarks, etc., that you can choose for your document. You can use these entries in addition to your own AutoText entries for your documents.

Note! Your AutoText entries maintain its formatting when inserted into a document.

This is for PCs, Macs and other platforms that support Word

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Creating an AutoText Entry

To begin, highlight the text in your Word document that you’d like to use to create your new AutoText entry. Refer to below image:

Word AutoText 1
Selecting the text for your AutoText entry

Press Alt+F3 to open the Create New Building Block window. Then, type in a name (within the 32-character limit) for your AutoText entry. Next, click OK. See following image:

Word AutoText 2
Saving your AutoText entry

Your AutoText entry will be saved. Now that was easy.

Using an AutoText Entry

To use your AutoText entry, place your cursor where you want to insert the text in your Word document. Navigate to the Insert tab and click the Explore Quick Parts icon in the Text group. See below image:

Word AutoText 3
Accessing your AutoText

A drop-down menu will be displayed. Hover your pointer over AutoText. Refer to below image:

Word AutoText 4
Selecting the AutoText feature

A list of AutoText entries will appear. Select the one you want to use. See below image:

Word AutoText 5
Inserting your custom AutoText entry

The entry you selected will be inserted into your document.

Deleting an AutoText Entry

If your AutoText list is getting crowded, or you made a mistake when you created a custom entry, you can delete them.

To do so, go back to the Insert tab and select the Text group. Then click the Explore Quick Parts icon, and then hover your pointer over AutoText.

From here, right-click the AutoText entry you want to delete. In the context pop-up menu that appears, click the option Organize and Delete. Refer to following image:

Word AutoText 6
Accessing the Delete option

The Building Blocks Organizer window will be displayed with your AutoText entry highlighted. At the bottom of this dialog box, click on Delete. See below image:

Word AutoText 7
The delete button at the end of the AutoText entries

A message box will appear asking you to confirm the deletion of your entry. To delete this entry, click Yes. Refer to below image:

Word AutoText 8
Confirming your custom AutoText deletion

Now your entry will be deleted. You have successfully adding, inserted and deleted an AutoText entry. That’s it.

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How to Insert and Use a Custom Word Footer in Three Clicks

Over the past few months, I have researched on how to do this, create a footer that I can use repeatly without doing a manual insert of footer elements. I finally found an article on how to partly do this. In my example, we are going in inset a document footer with the latest date on the left, the document name in the middle and the page number on the right. Yes, it will take a little time but it’s worth the one-time investment. You will save time and effort in using this feature.

If you’ve got a favorite document footer like mine, you can save that using the Quick Parts feature of Microsoft Word. What a lot of users don’t know is that Quick Parts can be saved under different categories to be accessible under different menus.

Let’s use my favorite footer as an example. I’ve constructed one in a blank document using a three column table: the left column has the current Date, the middle column contains the File Name and the right column shows “Page X of Y“. Also, I’ve turned off the borders in the table; those lines you see are simply the grid lines that display in Word.

This is for Word for Office 365 PCs and Macs that support Quick Parts. Other versions of Word will be similar.

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Lets get started.

Navigate to the the Insert tab, then to the Header option. Head to the bottom of the options and select Edit Footer. Your footer will be activated with the pointer in the left hand column.

Once again, go to the Insert tab, then select the Table option. Highlight the first 3 columns with your pointer. You will see 3 x 1 table description at top of your screen. Now, just click on the third grid element in the first row and the table will be inserted into your footer. See following image:

Word Footer A
Selecting the table to be inserted for the custom footer

Inserting Current Date

In the first column of the footer table, type in the text Date: (there is one space after the text) then navigate to the Insert tab and click on the Date & Time option in the Text group. Select your date format and click OK. See below image:

Word Footer 3
Selecting the current Date format to be inserted into your custom footer

Inserting File Name

Now, hit the Tab key once, or move your pointer to the middle column. Again, go to the the Insert tab, then to the Footer option. Navigate to the bottom of the options and select Edit Footer. In the Insert group, select Document Info, then select File Name.

UPDATE: If you do not see Document Info, in the Search box type in “Add document info” and follow its steps.

Refet to below image:

Word Footer H
Selecting the File Name to be inserted

Note! For demo purposes, I named this example document as &Filename. See below image:

Word Footer I
Showing the inserteed Date and File Name for your custom footer

Inserting Page Number

Now, tab once more or position your pointer in the right column. Once again, from the Insert tab, select Page Number from the Header & Footer group. Next, hoover your pointer over Current Position and select Bold Numbers under the Page X of Y group. Refer to below image:

Word Footer B
Inserting the Page Number as bold text for Page X of Y into your custom footer

Your footer elements will look similar to the following image:

Word Footer C
Showing all elements for your custom footer

Formatting the Custom Footer

Now, you may want to align your footer elements. In my example, I am aligning the File Name to be centered. For the Page Number, I am choosing right justified. The Date is already left justified. At this point, you can change the font and/or font size and other formatting options. You may want to change font size for File Name to allow for long document names. Refer to below image:

Word Footer D
Aligning the footer elements for your custom footer

Next, lets remove the borders for our footer table. Right click on the “+” sign located to the left of the table, then select Table Properties. See below image:

Word Footer E
Accessing the Table Properties for your custom footer

Now, select Borders and Shadings option. Under the Borders tab, select the None option, then click OK, then click OK again to remove the borders. Refer to below image:

Word Footer F
Removing the borders for your custom footer

Your final footer result will be similar to the following image:

Word Footer G
The final result of your custom footer

If you make a mistake, start from the miscue or start from stratch. As you can see, there are a lot of manual steps. So, instead of repeating all of the above just to insert a footer, we can easily access our favorite footer by using the Quick Parts feature.

Setting Up the Quick Part Feature

Highlight the footer with your pointer or click on the “+“sign located to the left of the table. Next, navigate back to the Insert tab. Select the Quick Parts option in the Text group. Then choose Save Selection to Quick Park Gallery. See below image:

Word Footer K
Saving your custom footer to Quick Parts

Give the Footer a unique name, mine is My Best Footer. In the Gallery drop-down box, select Footers. In the Category drop-down box, select General. Now, give the footer a Description. When you are finished, click OK. Refer to below image:

Word Footer L
Setting up the custom footer building block

Now your favorite footer will be an available selection whenever you click Footer on the Insert tab. Refer to following image:

Word Footer M
Displaying your custom footer entry

Using Your Custom Footer

To try out your custom footer, open a blank document. Navigate to the Insert tab (click one), select the Footer option (click two). Locate your recent entry and click on it (click three). Your footer selection will be inserted. And you only used three clicks! See below image:

Word Footer N
Inserting your custom footer into a document

There are a whole bunch of other Quick Parts Galleries available for you to save your favorite snippets in. For example, you could have a Quick Parts that inserts your “ Initials _____” on the last page of a draft. Another Quick Parts would be creating and inserting your favorite Watermark.

Edit Your Custom Footer Properties

Navigate to the Insert tab. Select the Quick Parts option in the Text group. Then choose the Building Blocks Organizer option. Next, locate and click on your custom footer entry. Then, click on the Edit Prolerties tab. Here you can change the custom Name, the Gallery, the Category, etc. Its best to leave the Gallery set to Footers and Category set to General.

UPDATE: To make your custom footer float to the top, select enter a new Category, and label it Alpha instead of selecting General.

Once you are finished, click OK. Refer to below image:

Word Footer P
Editing your custom footer properties

Delete Your Custom Footer

Navigate back to the Insert tab. Select the Quick Parts option in the Text group. Then choose Building Blocks Organizer option. Next, locate and click on your custom footer entry. Then, click on the Delete tab. To complete the deletion process, click OK. See following image:

Word Footer O
Deleting your custom footer

When you Exit Microsoft Word, you will see the following screen. Make sure you click Save to save your custom footer in the Building Blocks.dotx file, where your custom footer is stored. This is easy to overlook. If you don’t Save, you will lose your custom footer or any other snippet you created during your Word session.

Word Footer Q
Your final dialog box upon exiting Word. You must click Save to save your work.

You have successfully created, inserted, edited and deleted a custom footer.

I Would Like to Hear From You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath

Using the Microsoft Word Zoom In or Out Feature

I get frustrated when Microsoft Word does not remember my last zoom setting for a document. At times it seems to just forget. It will bring up four pages when I only want to work on one page. To help us out, let’s explore a few options of the Zoom feature.

The Zoom bar is located on the right side of the status bar at the bottom for a Word document. To use the Zoom bar, click and drag the slider to the right or left to zoom out or in. As you do so, the page percentage decreases or increases. Also, you can click the “+” or “-” sign to zoom out or in by 10% increments.

This is for Word for Office 365 Windows and Mac versions. Other versions of Word will be similar.

The Zoom Dialog

If you want more control, the Zoom Dialog Box offers a few more options. To access this, select View>Zoom. You will see the following screen:

Word Zoom Options
Word Zoom options

You can choose a predefined option, like “75%”, as noted on the left hand side of the dialog box. Alternatively, you can choose the up and down arrows in the Percent button to increase or decrease the percentage in 1% increments. These percentages will differ depending on your device’s screen size of your Word windows (full screen, half screen, etc). When you are finished, click OK.

Some Shortcuts

If your are using a touchscreen or touchpad, you can take advantage of the pinch to zoom feature. This feature allows you to zoom out or in by placing two fingers on the screen. To Zoom out, you pinch your fingers together, to Zoom in, you separate your fingers.

If you are using a mouse, you can hold the Ctrl button and scroll the wheel up or down to Zoom in and out. Some mouses have separate flywheel buttons for zooming in or out.

I Would Like to Hear from You

Please feel free to leave a comment. I would love hearing from you. Do you have a computer or smart device tech question? I will do my best to answer your inquiry. Please mention the device, app and version that you are using. To help us out, you can send screenshots of your data related to your question.

The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath