How to Remove All Images in a Word Document

If you need to quickly remove all the images and graphics from a Microsoft Word document, it’s easy to use a built-in option to delete them all at once.

If you need to quickly remove all the images and graphics from a Microsoft Word document, it’s easy to use a built-in option to delete them all at once. Let’s explore how this is done.

This is for devices running Microsoft Word

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The Technique

Microsoft Word includes a feature called Find and Replace to find items in your documents and replace them with something of your choice. Using this feature, you can find all the images in your document and replace them with nothing. This removes the images and leaves a blank space where they were located.

As a slight drawback, this technique will also remove all charts and graphs from your document.

The Removal Process

First, open your document with Microsoft Word. Next, in the menu at the top of the window, click Home. Now, click Replace in the Editing section of the toolbar. Refer to below image:

Image 1
Accessing the Replace button

Next, in the Find and Replace window, click the Find what box. In this box, type:

^g

(Alternately, you can click the More button, and then select Special and Graphic from the drop-down menu. Word will insert a ^g for you.)

In this case, ^g is a special code that means “graphic.” This “graphic” tag includes all images, charts, or graphs in your document. But no need to worry, you can undo this step later if you remove the images by mistake.

Now, click Replace All at the bottom of the window. See below image:

Image 2
Selecting Replace All to remove all images

All images in your document will be removed. A pop-up window will appear denoting the number of images removed. Click OK to close the window. See following image:

Image 3
Pop-up window denoting number of images replaced with a blank line

If you want to bring them back, press Ctrl+Z on Windows or Command+Z on Mac to undo the removal process. Or, you can insert images again if necessary. (You may need to edit your document to remove blank lines). Now, save your changes (if any) and exit Word.

Quote For the Day

The art of teaching is the art of assisting discovery.

Mark Van Doren

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How to Insert an Animated GIF Into Word

Adding an animated GIF GIF to your Word document is useful if you want to convey a message, demonstrate an activity, capture the audience’s attention, or just add some flair.

Adding an animated GIF to your Word document is useful if you want to convey a message, demonstrate an activity, capture the audience’s attention, or just add some flair. Let’s explore how this is done.

This is for devices running Windows 10 and Word. Screenshots are from Word in Office 365

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Microsoft Word lets you insert animated GIFs stored on your computer’s hard drive. The process for inserting a GIF in a Word document is no different than inserting a photo. Unfortunately, this only works in Microsoft Word for Windows 10. If you are a Mac user, you can still insert a GIF, but it will not be animated.

First, launch Word and place the cursor in the document’s location where you want the GIF to appear. Now, in the Illustrations group of the Insert tab, click Pictures. Next, choose This Device from the drop-down menu. Refer to below image:

GIF 1
Selecting where to find a GIF

Now, the File Explorer will open. Next, locate and select the GIF you want to insert, then click Insert. See below image:

GIF 3
Selecting a GiF to insert

The GiF will appear in your Word document. If you want to pause the Animation, click the pause icon in the bottom-left corner of the image. See following image:

GIF 6
Your GIF inserted into Word

To add alt text, right-click the GIF and then select Edit Alt Text from the context menu. Refer to below image:

GIF 4
Selecting the Edit Alt Text option

The Alt Text pane will appear to the right of the window. Type the desired alt text in the text box. See below image:

GIF 5
Entering your Alt Text

You have now learned how to insert an animated GIF into your Microsoft Word document. Congratulations!

Quote For the Day

If you are not sitting at the table, you are on the menu.

Jenny Boyer, MD, President of Tulsa County Medical Association

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How to Insert a YouTube Video Into Word

There might be times when it would be helpful to add a YouTube video to a Microsoft Word document. It can help you get your point across or help with training. Inserting the YouTube video directly into the document makes it easier to watch it. Word allows you to include the video right inside the document. Then the reader does not need to click a link to the video and launch a separate browser instance.

There might be times when it would be helpful to add a YouTube video to a Microsoft Word document. It can help you get your point across or help with training. Inserting the YouTube video directly into the document makes it easier to watch it. Word allows you to include the video right inside the document. Then the reader does not need to click a link to the video and launch a separate browser instance. Let’s explore how this is done.

This is for Word. Screenshots are from Word in Office 365 and Chrome using Windows 10

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If you follow my example, I will be using a YouTube video from the 2008 Winner in a Poland ballroom dance competition on BBC One. I have been ballroom dancing for 15 years and this is one of the best ballroom dance videos I have found. As of this writing, the video has been viewed over 3.9 million times. I hope you enjoy the video and this post.

Copy YouTube Video URL

To insert a YouTube video into your Word document, open your browser of choice (I am using Chrome) and go to the YouTube website. Now, search for a YouTube video that you want to use by typing the name of the video in the search bar. Next, click the search button or simply press Enter. Refer to below image:

Entering your YouTube video name

Next, select the video from the search results by clicking it. See below image:

Accessing your YouTube video

Now, highlight the video’s URL in the browser’s address bar. Right-click and then select Copy from the context menu. (This is the easiest option). See following image:

YouTube 3
Copy the URL of your YouTube video

Copy YouTube Embed Code

Alternately, to get the embed code, click Share under the video. Refer to below image:

YouTube 4
Accessing your YouTube video Share option

Next, in the Share window, select Embed. See below image:

YouTube 5
Selecting your YouTube video Embed option

Now, the Embed Video window will appear. Click Copy to copy the code to your clipboard. Optionally, if you want to start the video from a specific time, check the box next to Start At and enter the desired time. See following image:

YouTube 6
Copy your YouTube video Embed code

Insert URL or Embed Code

With the URL or embed code copied to your clipboard, open Word. Next, place your pointer where you want to insert your video.

Now, from the top toolbar, click the Insert tab, then select Online Video in the Media group. Refer to below image:

YouTube 7
Selecting the Inset option for Online Video

The Insert a Video dialog box will appear. Next, paste (Ctrl+V or right-click > Paste) the URL or embed code in the text box, then click Insert. See below image where I used the URL:

YouTube 8
Copy/Paste the URL of your YouTube video

The video will now be inserted into the Word document. Clicking the play button will make the video pop out in the foreground while the background is dimmed. Press the Play button again to start. To pause, just click the video.

Your YouTube Video in Word

All of the normal video controls you would find on YouTube are also available for the video inserted into your Word document. See following image on how the video is displayed in Word:

YouTube 9
Your YouTube video inside of a Word document

Quote For the Day

Everybody gets so much information all day long that they lose their common sense.”

Gertrude Stein

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How to Insert a PowerPoint Slide Into a Word Document

The advantage of the Microsoft Office suite is that all the programs in the collection work quite well together. An example is the ability to link or embed a Microsoft PowerPoint slides into a Microsoft Word document.

The advantage of the Microsoft Office suite is that all the programs in the collection work quite well together. An example is the ability to link or embed a Microsoft PowerPoint slides into a Microsoft Word document. Lets explore how this is done.

This is for devices running PowerPoint and Word

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Linking vs. Embedding Explained

If you link or embed a PowerPoint slide in a Word document, the goal is always the same; to provide an external reference that complements the content of the document. However, there are subtle differences between linking and embedding that you should be aware of.

The difference between linking and embedding an object is how the object’s data is stored and how the object’s content is updated. Since data is stored differently between the two methods, the content update process will also be different.

If you link an object, then that link simply sends the reader to the location of the source object when clicked. The file itself does not actually store any data from the linked object to the file. This is advantageous if the object you are linking to is large in size and you need to reduce the size of your Word document.  The downside is that if the location of the linked object changes, the link in your Word document will break.

If you embed an object, then you do not need to worry about whether the location of the object changes, as it becomes part of the document itself. That is, Word stores the object data in the actual Word file. The good news is that you do not have to worry about broken links in your document. The downside is that when the object is updated, those updates are not reflected in your embedded object, because there is no link connecting it to the source. Also, you will need to consider that the file size increases with embedded objects.

Link or Embed a PowerPoint Slide into a Word Document

First, open the PowerPoint project that contains the slide you want to link or embed. Now, select the desired slide by clicking its preview thumbnail. Refer to below image:

PowerPoint 1
Selecting a PowerPoint slide

Next, copy the slide to your clipboard by using the Ctrl+c (Cmd+c on Mac) keyboard shortcut, or by right-clicking the slide and selecting Copy from the context menu. See below image:

PowerPoint 2
Selecting the Copy option

Now, open your Word document you would like to link or embed the slide to. In the Clipboard group of the Home tab, click the down arrow under Paste. See following image:

PowerPoint 3
Selecting the Paste option

In the drop-down menu, click Paste Special. Refer to below image:

PowerPoint 4
Selecting the Paste Special option from drop-down list

The Paste Special window will appear. If you have copied the PowerPoint slide to your clipboard, you will see a Microsoft PowerPoint Slide Object option in the box under As. Next, click it to select the option. If you do not see this option, repeat the above steps. You may not have copied the slide to your Clipboard.

  • To embed the slide, click the bubble icon next to Paste
  • To link the slide, click the bubble icon next to Paste Link.

Now, select OK to insert the linked or embedded object. See below image:

PowerPoint 5
Selecting the Paste option to embed the PowerPoint slide

Your final Word document should look like the following image:

PowerPoint 6
Your Word document with the PowerPoint slide embedded

The Microsoft PowerPoint slide is now linked or embedded into your Microsoft Word document.

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How to Insert a File into Another Word Document

When creating or modifying a Microsoft Word document, it can be beneficial to insert or embed another file into it. By inserting a file into a Word document, that file becomes a part of the Word document. A reader can open and view the embedded file without requiring special permission or access.

When creating or modifying a Microsoft Word document, it can be beneficial to insert or embed another file into it. By inserting a file into a Word document, that file becomes a part of the Word document. A reader can open and view the embedded file without requiring special permission or access.

Nearly any file can be inserted into a Word document, However, be aware that inserting a file into a Word document can increase its size significantly.

In this post, instead of using “copy and paste” from one document into another, we will show you another way, using the Insert feature.

This is for devices running Word

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First, open the Word document that you would like to add the contents of, another Word document to.

Next, in the Text group of the Insert tab, click the drop-down arrow next to the Object option. Refer to below image:

Copy 1
Accessing the Object option

A drop-down menu will appear. There are two options to choose from here; Object and Text From File.

  • Object: Embeds an object such as a Word document or Excel chart
  • Text From File: Inserts the text from another file into your Word document

The Text From File option is essentially a quicker way to “copy and paste” the content of another file into this one.

Now, click the Text From File option in the drop-down menu. See below image:

Copy 2
Accessing the Text from file option from drop-down menu

Next, the File Explorer (Finder on Mac) will open. Find the file you would like to copy the text from, select it, then click Insert. See following image:

Copy 3
Selecting the file to be inserted into original Word document

The contents of that Word document will now appear in the current Word document. This works well if there is not a lot of content in the other Word document, but if there is, embedding it may be a better option.

You may want to add headings/subheadings to the inserted document.

If your original Word document has a Table of Contents, make sure you update your table. First, under the References tab, select the Update Table option. Refer to below image:

Copy 4
Accessing Update Table option

Now, from the pop-up window that will be displayed, select an option. It is recommended you choose the Update entire table option, then cli ck OK. See below image:

Copy 5
Selecting how you want the Table of Contents to be updated

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How to Insert an Outlook Contact Into Word

There are a number of ways to insert contact information into a Word document, like using Mail Merge. But what if you just wanted to insert specific Outlook contacts. The easiest way is by adding an Address Book button to the Quick Address Toolbar (QAT) so that you can add contacts on-the-fly and at the touch of a button in any Microsoft Office application.

There are a number of ways to insert contact information into a Word document, like using Mail Merge. But what if you just wanted to insert specific Outlook contacts. The easiest way is by adding an Address Book button to the Quick Address Toolbar (QAT) so that you can add contacts on-the-fly and at the touch of a button in any Microsoft Office application. Lets explore how to insert an Outlook contact into Microsoft Word.

This is for devices running Microsoft Word

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Adding the QAT Address Book Button

(If you have already done this, you may skip this step). To add the button, click the arrow icon in the QAT. This icon opens a drop-down menu that allows you to customize the QAT. Refer to below image:

Contacts 1
Accessing the Quick Access Toolbar

Now, from the available options, choose More Commands. See below image:

Contacts 2
Choosing More Commands

Next, click the Quick Access Toolbar from the left sidebar. Now, choose Commands Not in the Ribbon from the Choose Commands From drop-down menu. See following image:

Contacts 3
Accessing commands not on the ribbon

Now, choose Address Book. Next, click the Add button to add it to the QAT. Refer to below image:

Contacts 4
Adding the Address Book button to the ribbon

Finally, click OK to add the Address Book button. See below image:

Contacts 5
Saving your change for the ribbon

Inserting Contacts Into a Word Document

To insert a contact, position the cursor where you would like to add the contact information. Next, from the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Address Book icon you just added. See following image:

Contacts 6
Selecting the Address Book button to insert a contact

Now, contact names from your address book should appear. If you have multiple address books, select one from the drop-down box to view its contacts. Click the contact you would like to add, then click the OK button. Refer to below image:

Contacts 7
Inserting an Address Book contact into Word

Now, any information that you have for the contact should appear in the document. This, however, is almost entirely up to how thorough you are in creating the contact. For some, it will be just a name and an email address. For others, you will get the full details that includes address, phone number, and the like. It all depends on what you added when you created a new contact (or edited it later).

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How to Use Emoji in Microsoft Word

One of the most common forms of shorthand communication developed for the mobile age is the icon-based vocabulary known as Emoji. You have seen those seen Emoji pictures on social media. It’s available for Microsoft Word in Windows 10, MacOS, iOS, iPadOS, and Android.

One of the most common forms of shorthand communication developed for the mobile age is the icon-based vocabulary known as Emoji. You have seen those seen Emoji pictures on social media. It’s available for Microsoft Word in Windows 10, MacOS, iOS, iPadOS, and Android.

Microsoft Word is an indisputable application in the documentation world. When preparing documentations, you can easily insert Emoji to jazz up a Word document on various devices.

You can enter an Emoji in Word in the same way you can enter an Emoji in any other application. While typing in a Word document, just use the appropriate keyboard shortcut for your operating system. Let!s explore how this is done.

This is for devices supporting Microsoft Word. Screenshots are from Windows 10

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Open Rmoji Keyboard

Open your Word document and position the cursor where you want to insert the Emoji.

  • For Windows 10 – Press, “Windows + Period” keys or “Windows + Semicolon” keys to open the Emoji picker.
  • For MaOS – Press “Command + Control + Space” keys to open Emoji keyboard on a Mac, which is a Character Viewer app in MacOS.
  • For iPhone, iPad, or Android phone, you can use the standard Emoji keyboard.

These keyboard shortcuts work in basically all Windows or Mac applications.

A pop-up will be displayed with all popular emoji symbols. The most frequently used Emoji will appear first. Refer to below image:

Emoji 1
The Emoji keyboard

Searching for an Emoji

On both Windows and Mac, you can start typing the name of an Emoji to search for it. For example, to find “music” related Emoji, just start typing a few characters of the keyword. You can also just scroll through the long list of Emoji to find one.

Use the arrow keys and press Enter or click an Emoji to insert it. See below image:

Emoji 2
Searching for a music Emoji

The Emoji you insert into your document will appear as a colorful icon. You can resize them. adjust their font size, just as you would with any other text in the document.

See following image for an inserted “music”Emoji followed by text:

Emojii 3
Inserting an Emoji followed by some text

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How to Insert a PDF into Word

One unique feature of Microsoft Word is the ability to insert a PDF file directly into Word, and it can be done in only a few steps. You can insert it as an embedded object, a linked object, or text only.

One unique feature of Microsoft Word is the ability to insert a PDF file directly into Word, and it can be done in only a few steps. You can insert it as an embedded object, a linked object, or text only. Let’s explore how to do this.

This is for devices supporting Microsoft Word

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Embedding Explained

When you embed a PDF file in Word, the first page of your PDF appears in the document. Since an embedded object becomes part of the document after it is inserted, it’s no longer connected to the source file. Any changes made to the original PDF in the future will not be reflected in the Word document.

Linking Explained

Inserting a PDF file as a linked object means it appears as the first page of the PDF, but it is also linked to the original file. Changes made to the PDF will also be reflected in the Word document. You can opt to display an icon instead of a preview. Either option will open the PDF file when selected.

Text Only Explained

Inserting a PDF as text involves the use of copy and paste. Copying the text from the PDF file and pasting it into a document is a straightforward way to insert a bit of text into Word.

Embed or Link a PDF

First, open a Word document, and place your cursor where you would like to insert the PDF file. Next, select the Insert tab. Refer to below image:

Insert PDF 1
Selecting the Insert tab

Now, click Object from the Text group. See below image:

Insert PDF 2
Selecting the Object option

From the small drop-down menu, select Object. See following image:

Insert PDF 3
Selecting the Object option from drop-down menu

From the Object window, click the Create from File tab. Next, select Browse. Refer to below image:

Insert PDF 4
From the Create from file tab, selecting the Browse option

Navigate to the location of the PDF, select it, and then click Insert. See below image:

Insert PDF 5
Selecting your PDF file to Insert into Word

Selecting Your Options

Now, it is time to decide if you want to (1) link directly to the source file, and/or (2) display the PDF as an icon. Link directly to the source file if you want to have the inserted file reflect any new changes made to the source file. To do so, just checkmark the Link to file option. You are linking to the PDF in your document.

While here, checkmark Display as icon if you don’t want to take up too much space on the page. If you do not enable any of these options, the PDF will be displayed in its entirety on the Word document and will not reflect any new changes made to the source file. You are embedding the PDF into your document.

To finish, select OK. Refer to below image:

Insert PDF 6
Selecting ink your PDF file and display an icon

The PDF will now be inserted in the Word document. See below image:

Insert PDF 7
Your linked PDF file displayed as an icon in Word

Copy and Paste

Copy

First, open your PDF file. Now, highlight some text you want to copy. Next, right-click your selection and select Copy.

Paste

Second, open your Word document. Now, place the cursor where you want to paste the text from the PDF file. Next, right-click and select a Paste option with or without formatting.

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How to Set the Oxford Comma in Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word can warn you about the Oxford or “serial comma”, whether you prefer to use the extra comma or not. It is a feature in the latest Word 365 and Word 2019 and goes back to Word 2002. By default, the option is off.

Microsoft Word can warn you about the Oxford or “serial comma”, whether you prefer to use the extra comma or not. It is a feature in the latest Word 365 and Word 2019 and goes back to Word 2002. By default, the option is off.

The Oxford comma is one of those grammatical things that most people do not worry about. It is a question of whether to add a comma at the end of a list, for example:

Raymond is teaching on Word, Excel, Access and Outlook.

Or using the Oxford comma:

Raymond is teaching on Word, Excel, Access, and Outlook.

It is okay to ingnore the Oxford comma for personal documents, emails, tweets and your personal Facebook page. However for business purposes, especially legal documents, you should use the Oxford comma. Avoiding the use of the Oxford comma has resulted in various lawsuits forcing companies to pay employees millions; what was implied without the comma failed in the courts. Moral of the lawsuits; use the Oxford comma for clarity and to avoid lawsuits.

In our example, using the Oxford comma says Raymond is teaching each class separately. Without the comma denotes that Raymond is teaching Access and Outlook as a combined class.

The setting for the Oxford comma has changed in the various Word versions.

This is for Word 365, Word 2019, and Word 2016 for PCs and Macs

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Finding the Oxford Comma

Open a Word document. Next, click the File menu option. Now, navigate to

Options > Proofing > Writing Style > Settings

Now, scroll down the long list till you see the Oxford Comma checkbox in the Punctuation Conventions section. Refer to below image:

Oxford Comma 1
The Oxford Comma option

Setting the Oxford Comma

Checking the box will enforce the comma in lists. A missing Oxford comma will show a red dashed line with the suggestion “A comma before “and” or “or” could make this clearer.” See below image:

Oxford Comma 2
The Oxford Comma suggestion

Grammar checking in English is hard but the software does a remarkable job. This being said, the feature is not perfect and is no substitute for proof reading.

While discussing grammer, there is another similar situation. I see a lot of blog posts using words like “It’s” or Doesn”t”. The correct usage is to avoid using the apostrophe. In my examples, you would spell out the words to say “It is” and “Does not” for clarity.

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How to Hear a Document with Speak in Word

Microsoft Word for Windows has a “text to speech” or Speak feature to read back a document. It’s hiding away behind the Ribbon but works fine once you’ve found it. We are going to add the icon to the Quick Access Toolbar (QAT) for easy accessiblity.

Microsoft Word for Windows has a “text to speech” or Speak feature to read back a document.  It’s hiding away behind the Ribbon but works fine once you’ve found it. We are going to add the icon to the Quick Access Toolbar (QAT) for easy accessiblity. Lets explore how to do this.

This is for Microsoft Word 2010 through latest version

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Speak button can be put on the Quick Access Toolbar (QAT) or Ribbon. Refer to below image for the Speak icon on QAT:

Windows Speak 1
The Speak icon on Quick Access Toolbar

While in Word, select some text or Ctrl + A for the whole document, then click the Speak icon. If there’s no selection, clicking Speak will say the current word at the cursor.

Add the Speak Icon

You’ll find Speak on the Commands not on the Ribbon list.  The easiest choice is adding it to the Quick Access Toolbar. Just click on the Down Arrow in the Menu Bar and select More Commands. See below image:

Windows Speak 2
More Commands option

The Quick Access Toolbar will be displayed. Select Commands Not in the Ribbon from the drop down box and locate the Speak command. Next, click the Add button to add the command to the Quick Access Toolbar. Click OK when finished. Refer to below image:

Adding the Speak option to the Quick Access Toolbar

Now it’s on the Quick Access Toolbar. Just select some text and click the Speak icon.

Change the Voice

To access the controls for Speak or Read Aloud:

  1. Access the Control Panel via the Cortana search bar. Just enter Control Panel, then click the button in upper left hand corner.
  2. Click Speech Recognition
  3. Click Text to Speech

Word Speak is making use of a little-appreciated Text to Speech part of Windows.  See following image:

Windows Speak 4
Text to Speech dialog

That means the Speech options available depend somewhat on the version of Windows, not Office. Some of the options are:

Voice Selection – the English language options are “David” or “Zira” – male or female.

Preview Voice – click to hear the current voice.

Voice speed – faster or slower than the Normal setting.

To start the Speech at Windows startup, click the Speech Recognition tab and checkmark Run Speech Recognition at startup. When finished, click OK. See below image:

Windows Speak 5
Selecting Text to Speech at Windows startup

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The author’s Vietnam eBook on the Battle for Tra Bong: Events and Aftermath